Health and Human Performance

Dean Culpepper (Interim Department Head)
Location: Field House, 903-886-5549
Health and Human Performance Web Site

Sarah Mitchell, Interim Coordinator of Graduate Studies

Graduate programs offered in the Department of Health and Human Performance are designed to provide students with specialized training to enhance current job opportunities as well as prepare students for positions with public and private agencies in the areas of health and human performance. These graduate degree programs are designed to provide graduate students with:

  1. Knowledge and skills necessary to organize and administer programs of health and human performance;
  2. The ability to interpret, analyze, critique, and produce research within health and human performance that is current and relevant to communities of learners in our academic, professional, and global environments;
  3. Knowledge related to the current challenges and trends underlying programs of health and human performance;
  4. Tools to excel as a leader in the fields of health, kinesiology, and sport in a dynamic and digital society; and
  5. Applied knowledge and real world experience in diverse community and global settings.

Programs of Graduate Work

Master of Science in Health, Kinesiology, and Sports Studies

The Department of Health and Human Performance offers the following graduate degree: Master of Science (M.S.) in Health, Kinesiology, and Sports Studies with five different concentrations:  Exercise Science, Athletic Administration, International Sport Management, Sports Coaching and Human Performance (Accelerated BS-MS). For each of these concentrations, a minimum of 18 to 24 hours must be completed in the major field.

Master of Public Health in Public Health

The Master of Public Health program will prepare students with the skill-set needed to become leading public health professionals capable of addressing current and future health problems using multidisciplinary and evidence-based approaches. The curriculum is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skillset to work with diverse organizations focused on improving population health.  These include but are not limited to: Corporate, Commercial, Community-Based Health Agencies, Local to National agencies and more.

The degree is offered 100% online* to be more accessible to the working professional.  The MPH degree requires successful completion of a minimum of 42 semester credit hours. Most full-time students can expect to take approximately 18-24 months to complete the degree program.

Admission

Admission to a graduate program is granted by the Dean of the Graduate School upon the recommendation of the department. Applicants must meet the following requirements for admission in addition to meeting the general university requirements in health, kinesiology, and sports studies. 

Each applicant will be evaluated on his/her successful completion of an undergraduate degree in health, kinesiology, human performance or a closely related field.  The applicant will also be evaluated on undergraduate or graduate GPA, two recommendation forms or letters of reference from sources acquainted with the applicants academic capabilities (one preferably from a former professor), personal statement of goals and background, and resume/vita. With the consensus of departmental graduate faculty, deficient students may be granted conditional status. Deficiencies must be removed by the completion of foundation courses specific to the selected graduate program by the end of the second semester of enrollment.

Admission

Admission to a graduate program is granted by the Dean of the Graduate School upon the recommendation of the department. Applicants must meet the following requirements for admission in addition to meeting the general university requirements in Public Health.

Degree Requirements

All students must complete a departmental advisement guide before attaining 12 semester hours of graduate credit.  To complete the advisement guide, the student must consult with the department's Coordinator of Graduate Studies.  Students must maintain a grade point average of 3.00 on all graduate courses taken in the Department of Health and Human Performance.  In addition, all students must have a passing score on the departmental comprehensive exams.  In order to take the comprehensive exam, a departmental advisement guide must be on file; and all courses must be completed, or the student must be enrolled in final semester of courses.

Successful completion of the Comprehensive Exam is required of all students.

Note: Individual departments may reserve the right to dismiss from their programs students who, in their judgment, would not meet the professional expectations of the field for which they are training. 

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HHPH 510 - GLB/Principles of Environmental Health
Hours: 3
The purpose of the class is to introduce public health students to the field of environmental health, through a broad understanding of current health issues related to environmental factors. The course will focus on chemical, physical, and biological agents in the environment that influence human health. Students will be able to identify the causes and methodological approaches in the global health context. Topics discussed in the class will include specific diseases, populations, toxicants, risks, and occupational hazards.

HHPH 512 - Foundations in Public Health
Hours: 3
This course offers a broad introduction to the application of social and behavioral sciences in public health. Focus is on theoretical approaches used in facilitating behavioral, social and cultural changes needed for improving population health. Students learn the importance of applying multidisciplinary theory based perspectives to tackle real-world public health challenges.

HHPH 514 - Global Perspective of Nutrition
Hours: 3
This course examines malnutrition and how it occurs by analyzing several situations from around the world. Covers how nutrition can affect society and community and examines benefits of well-nourished populations. Analyzes major food and nutritional issues that affect health, survival, and human development in resource-limited settings.

HHPH 518 - Thesis
Hours: 3-6
Thesis (Same as HHPK 518).

HHPH 531 - Nutrition and Optimal Performance
Hours: 3
Nutrition and Optimal Performance. Three semester hours. A study of nutrition as it relates to optimum performance and health. Nutrient need, sources, functions and interactions are reviewed according to the latest scientific findings. Principles of body conditioning are emphasized with attention to diet and lifestyle practices that promote health and decrease risks of nutrition related diseases.

HHPH 537 - Public Health Practicum
Hours: 6
Supervised practical experience at selected community, public or private health agencies. Site must be approved by the department. Students must be in their final semester of coursework. Prerequisites: Instructor approval required; must be completed in final semester.

HHPH 544 - Health Management and Leadership
Hours: 3
A consideration of managing health/fitness programs at the workplace and in other agencies. Includes budgeting, revenue, personnel, emergency procedures and safety, legal liability, facility management staff development, marketing record keeping, policies and procedures, and various management strategies.

HHPH 547 - GLB/Health Psychology
Hours: 3
An examination of the contributions of psychological research performed to the understanding, prevention, and treatment of a variety of health concerns. The biopsychosocial model of health and illness will be emphasized. Social, emotional, behavioral, biological, and spiritual factors that influence health in a global environment will be explored.

HHPH 550 - Diversity and Health
Hours: 3
To examine the ways in which diverse personal, socio-cultural, and institutional factors impact health, including race/ethnicity/culture, racism, socioeconomic class, gender, sexism, place, age, and spirituality, and to facilitate culturally competence health promotion/disease prevention initiatives.

HHPH 585 - Program Planning & Evaluation
Hours: 3
A study of necessary skills for the development, delivery, and evaluation of health programs to targeted populations. Courses of study, workshop planning, and special programs will be developed for appropriate target group. Prerequisites: HHPH 512 with a minimum grade of C.

HHPH 587 - Epidemiology
Hours: 3
Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of health and disease in different human populations and the application of methods to improve disease outcomes. As such, epidemiology is the basic science of public health. This course will introduce students in all fields of public health to the background, basic principles and methods of public health epidemiology investigation for both communicable and non-communicable diseases. Prerequisites: HHPK 617.

HHPH 589 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

HHPH 591 - Seminar
Hours: 1-3
Reports and discussions of topics of current interest in health and human performance.

HHPH 597 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4
Special Topics

HHPH 660 - GLB/Global Health Issues
Hours: 3
A focus on current health issues facing the world community. An epidemiological approach will be used in studying the causes and distribution of health related states and events in specified populations and the application of this information to the prevention and/or control of health problems.

HHPH 718 - Dissertation
Hours: 3-12
Doctoral Dissertation.

HHPK 516 - Current Topics in Health & Human Performance
Hours: 3
A study of current problems and trends in health and physical education. Local, regional, state, national, and global issues will be included in this course.

HHPK 517 - Interdisciplinary Topics in Human Performance
Hours: 3
An in-depth study of the fundamentals of interdisciplinary physical education programs with a focus on teaching models that guide in collaboration and integration of physical education content in other subject areas, organizing content, and creating meaningful activities that impact student learning.

HHPK 518 - Thesis
Hours: 3-6
Thesis. Six semester hours.

HHPK 519 - Research Methods in Health, Kinesiology, & Sport Studies
Hours: 3
A study of research methods and designs appropriate for proposing, conducting, reading, reporting and critiquing research in health, kinesiology, and sports studies. A major emphasis will be on conducting meta-analysis of research literature. Each student is required to demonstrate systematic research techniques through the investigation and formal reporting of an independent research project using meta-analysis, descriptive or experimental research design. For non-thesis options, this course meets 595 research requirements.

HHPK 522 - Teaching Health Related Fitness for K-12
Hours: 3
This course focuses on how to implement a lifetime, health-related physical fitness program in school and community settings. Students will improve their knowledge of fitness concepts, design learning activities, review the research on physical activity, and develop strategies to teach lifetime fitness to children and adolescents.

HHPK 523 - Teaching Games Content for K-12
Hours: 3
The purpose of the course is to learn to design appropriate experiences to assist children and adolescents in becoming skillful game players. The course will specifically focus on two games curriculum models: the Sport Education Model and the Tactical Games Approach. Games in the four primary areas of invasion, target, fielding, and net & wall games will be emphasized.

HHPK 528 - Sport Psychology
Hours: 3
A study of the relationship of psychology to sport: topics include history of sport psychology, application of learning principles, social psychology, personality variables, psychological assessment, youth sport, women in sport, the psychology of coaching, and performance enhancement.

HHPK 530 - Sports Conditioning
Hours: 3
Sports Conditioning. Three semester hours. A study of the scientific basis of conditioning athletes. Focus will be on cardiovascular and resistance conditioning in the off-season, pre-season, and in-season. An introduction and utilization of appropriate equipment for cardiovascular conditioning and resistance training will be examined.

HHPK 532 - Cardiopulmonary Physiology
Hours: 3
A study of normal physiological mechanisms during rest and during physical work and exercise. The focus of this course is on the mechanisms that affect the heart.

HHPK 533 - Stress Testing & Electrocardio
Hours: 3
Theoretical and practical experiences will be examined to assist in analysis and recognition of normal and abnormal electrocardiography at rest and exercise (ECG). Students will learn how to understanding and interpret ECG tracings, exercise prescription, and understand the mechanisms of cardiac activation in health and exercise.

HHPK 534 - Exercise in Health and Disease
Hours: 3
The analysis of mechanisms responsible for reduction of functional capacity as result of biological aging and/or loss of health. Use of preventive exercise program to diminish reduction and/or deterioration of physiological mechanisms as a function of age, health and disease.

HHPK 536 - Adapted Kinesiology
Hours: 3
Adapted Kinesiology. Three semester hours. Principles of adapting physical activities to individual needs. Instructional strategies, screening and testing procedures, and modification of equipment will be emphasized. Patterns of organization and administration of programs will also be addressed.

HHPK 537 - Internship in Health, Kinesiology, & Sport Studies
Hours: 3
Practical experience in a health, kinesiology, or sport studies worksite. Prerequisites: Instructor approval required in final semester.

HHPK 538 - Exercise Metabolism
Hours: 3
An investigation of metabolic processes, metabolic responses to exercise, regulatory mechanisms, sources, role, and regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism and potential metabolic bases of central and peripheral fatigue. Prerequisite: HHPK 532 and 535.

HHPK 540 - Supervision in Health and Kinesiology
Hours: 3
(Same as HIED 540) A study of philosophy, history, principles, organization, and techniques of supervision and their application to the supervision of health and kinesiology.

HHPK 545 - Advanced Exercise Physiology
Hours: 3
Application of basic physiological concepts to the programs of kinesiology, emphasis upon the physiological effects and adjustments occurring from participation in physical activity. Major factors in conditioning, fatigue, diet, and physical fitness are considered.

HHPK 546 - Ethics, Governance, and Legalities in Sports
Hours: 3
A study focusing on ethical problems in the contemporary sport industry and the theoretical models available for analyzing these problems. Various governing agencies, primarily the UIL and NCAA, in sport will also be studied emphasizing investigation of the legal ramifications, organizational structure, authority, membership, and influence of these sport governing bodies. Legal aspects of teaching, coaching, and administering athletic programs in secondary and post-secondary education and community settings will also be included.

HHPK 547 - Economics, Marketing and Public Relations in Sports
Hours: 3
A study of revenue sources available to sport organizations such as tax support, municipal and corporate bonds, ticket sales, concessions, fund raising, sponsorship, licensing and PSL's. Further study will include sport-marketing plans utilizing the concepts of product, price, promotion, sales and advertising. The course will further examine aspects of external and internal communication in sport pertaining to community, customer, employee and media relations.

HHPK 551 - Advanced Research in Kinesiology
Hours: 3
Transform research into publishable articles and presentations to various audiences. Emphasis will be on drafting, editing, and revising documents/presentations of the student’s individual research project. With sufficient data, students can produce an article ready for submission to a scholarly journal over the course of the semester.

HHPK 560 - Motor Development Issues
Hours: 3
Study of the influences of heredity and environment upon motor skill development. Theories of motor learning and motor control will be explored as they affect motor skill acquisition, retention, and transfer of motor skills. Techniques for appraising motor development are also studied.

HHPK 570 - Psy of Motor Learning
Hours: 3
Psychology of Motor Learning. Three semester hours. An investigation of psychological principles involved in motor performance. Particular attention will be given to the application of these principles in teaching game and sport skills and in the coaching of athletics.

HHPK 589 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

HHPK 590 - Sport Coaching
Hours: 3
This course will explore various coaching styles and strategies. Emphasis will be placed on development of coaching philosophies, assessment techniques and analyses, and athlete development. Current research and literature will be utilized.

HHPK 591 - Seminar
Hours: 1-3
Reports and discussions of topics of current interest in health and human performance.

HHPK 593 - Biomechanics
Hours: 3
Mechanical Analysis of Motor Skills. Three semester hours. A study of the basic mechanical principles and physical laws which govern human movement. Intensive study will be devoted to analysis of fundamental motor skills and to the use of these skills in dance and sports activities.

HHPK 595 - Critiquing & Conducting Research
Hours: 3
Critiquing and Conducting Research. Three semester hours. (Same as HHPH 595) A study of research methods and designs appropriate for proposing, conducting, reading, reporting and critiquing research in health, kinesiology, and sports studies. A major emphasis will be on conducting meta-analysis of research literature. Each student is required to demonstrate systematic research techniques through the investigation and formal reporting of an independent research project using meta-analysis, descriptive or experimental research design.

HHPK 597 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4
Special Topic

HHPK 617 - Stat Proc Hlth/Hum Perf
Hours: 3
An introductory study of statistical methods and their implications for education and research. Populations and samples; organizing, displaying, and summarizing data; probability; normal distribution; tests of significance; correlation and simple regression; Z and T tests; and the chi square test will be the focus of this course. Appropriate computer applications will be integrated into the course. This is an approved Level II doctoral research tools course.

HHPK 664 - Fitness Testing and Exercise Prescriptions
Hours: 3
Health-Related Fitness Testing and Exercise Prescriptions. Three semester hours. A study of field-based fitness testing and exercise prescriptions. The course will focus on the American College of Sports Medicine guidelines for fitness testing and exercise prescriptions. The health-related fitness parameters of cardio respiratory endurance, joint flexibility, muscular strength, muscular endurance and body composition will be studied in the course. Students will be given opportunity to participate in both classroom and laboratory experiences related to health-related physical fitness.

HHPK 718 - Dissertation
Hours: 3-12
Doctoral Dissertation.

HHPS 518 - Thesis
Hours: 3-6
Thesis

HHPS 520 - Governance and Ethics in Sport
Hours: 3
The study of ethical problems in the contemporary sport industry & the theoretical models for analyzing these problems. Various governing agencies in sport will be studied, & may include those at the high school, collegiate, & professional levels, emphasizing investigation of the organizational structure, authority, membership & influence of these sport governing bodies. Topics for discussion will include: governance practices in international sport, with a particular focus on organizations such as FIFA, UCI, IAAF & the ICC; how governance in sport can facilitate corruption in sport; cheating in sport; values and morals in the international sport industry; ethical decision making in athletic administration; the sport ethic; & the role of NCAA, UIL, & NFHS in leveling the playing field.

HHPS 521 - Fin & Econ in Sport
Hours: 3
The study of financial theories and practical application as they impact sport revenues and expenditures as well as the familiarization with current issues and trends in financing sport organizations. Potential areas for discussion include: international exchange and inflation rates; taxation; variance in revenue sources for sport around the world; demand for and supply of international sport; funding for high school, college, and professional mega stadiums; funding issues in college athletics (Title IX compliance, the "arms race" in intercollegiate athletics, coaching salaries, etc.); and pay for play issues.

HHPS 525 - Marketing and Public Relations in Sports
Hours: 3
The course involves an investigation of revenue source available to sport organizations and sport-marketing plans utilizing the concepts of product, price, promotion, sales and advertising. It will further examine aspects of external and internal communication in sport pertaining to community, customer, employee and media relations. Areas of focus include: the marketing of domestic, league and international sporting competitions; sports branding; event sponsorship and marketing; media involvement; the value and ROI of investing in sport; athlete endorsements; sponsorship in international sport; social media policies in high school and collegiate sport; and aligning marketing goals with that of the educational institution.

HHPS 535 - Soc of Sport & Phys Activity
Hours: 3
Sociology of Sport and Physical Activity - Three semester hours A study of the social institution of sport and physical activity and consequences for American society, including social organization from play to professional sport; violence, discrimination, and special populations; and socialization implications from participation in sports and physical activity.

HHPS 537 - Internship in Sport Studies
Hours: 3
Supervised internship with corporate fitness centers, rehabilitation centers, hospitals, recreation centers and similar agencies and organizations. Prerequisites: Instructor approval required in final semester.

HHPS 539 - Sport Law
Hours: 3
A study of the legal aspects of the professional sports industry, including the ways in which contract, labor, tort and antitrust law influence, impact and direct the development of relationships between leagues, athletes, agents, television, internet, advertisers and fans, and may also include international relations; EU law; and the role of the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in alternative dispute resolution.

HHPS 552 - Public Relations & Media in International Sport
Hours: 3
This class is intended to provide students with a working knowledge of the theories, techniques, and processes of public relations in the sport industry around the world and the importance thereof. Working with the media will also be a focus of the class. Topics to be discussed include: influencing methods of building good will; analysis of media; obtaining publicity; the implementation of public relations programs; writing press releases and holding press conferences; the importance of social media in the sport industry today; and dealing with the media in times of crisis.

HHPS 554 - Sport Event Management
Hours: 3
Millions of dollars are invested in the planning and hosting of sport events, from small, local, charity events, to mega-events, including the Olympics and the FIFA World Cup. This class will break down and analyze the processes in place to plan and host such events, underpinned by sport management and organizational leadership theory. Students will then utilize their learning in running a sport event. Topics that will be discussed in this context include: ticket sales, crowd control, security, customer satisfaction, human resources management, revenue generation, and marketing and sponsorship.

HHPS 556 - Sport Analytics
Hours: 3
The focus of this class will be to provide the basics for understanding and applying analytical techniques to professional teams both on the sport side (predicting player performance and outcomes) and the business side (establishing business models) of a sporting organization. A survey into basic statistical techniques (multiple regression, discriminant analysis, etc.) will be the foundation from which this class will work.

HHPS 558 - Managing People in International Sport
Hours: 3
This class focuses on Human Resource Management theory and its practical application in the context of international sport. By examining HR activities from around the world, students will be exposed to similarities and differences in culture and business practices in the global sport industry. Topics of focus will include: motivation; HRM law; the role of the volunteer in sport; managing athletes and other employees; global HR issues in sport governing bodies; and issues facing ethnic minorities, women and people with disabilities when working in the sport industry.

HHPS 562 - Hidden Disabilities in International Sport
Hours: 3
The purpose of this course is to examine the impact of hidden disabilities (e.g. ASD, PTSD, sensory processing disorders) on access and participation in sport around the world. Throughout the course we will discuss the challenges of having a hidden disability; whether the sports world is meeting the needs of this group of society; the impact of meeting their needs or not (particularly from a business perspective); and how sport organizations can be more inclusive.

HHPS 564 - Facilities & Equipment in Kinesiology & Sport
Hours: 3
This course is designed to provide students with information, practical knowledge, and skill competencies needed for facility and event management within the context of sport activities. Among the topics to be explored will be: sport facility and venue trends; planning and designing sport facilities; stadium development for different sports around the world; design and construction regulations; facility and event operations; risk assessment; and legal issues related to sport facility and event management.

HHPS 566 - Issues in International Sport
Hours: 3
The purpose of this class is to introduce some of the contemporary issues facing sport managers around the world and will begin to examine mechanisms that could be utilized in order to address the potential impacts of such issues. Topics to be discussed may include: racism, sexism and LGBTQ issues; corruption in international sport; sport for development, reconciliation, and peace; the implications and impact of the commercialization of sport; globalization of sport; and the power and influence of the media.

HHPS 570 - Corruption & Integrity in Sport
Hours: 3
The purpose of this course is to discuss the prevalence of corruption in international sport (both management and competition corruption) and begin to analyze mechanisms in place to attempt to restore integrity in sporting competition and governance of international sport organizations.

HHPS 584 - Administration in Sport and Recreation Programs
Hours: 3
This course is an overview of the nature and scope of administrative issues in the sport industry and recreational agencies and will expand the studens' understanding of management theories and their application to sport and recreatin administration.

HHPS 589 - INDEPENDENT STUDY
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

HHPS 594 - Ldshp in Sport and Recreation
Hours: 3
A study of the leadership theories and practices i recreational, collegiate, and professional sport and in recreational programs for youth organizations, institutions, industry, and public agencies.

HHPS 595 - Conducting Research in Sport Management
Hours: 3
A study of research methods and designs appropriate for proposing, conducting, reading, reporting and critiquing research in sport management. A major emphasis will be on conducting meta-analysis of research literature. Each student is required to demonstrate systematic research techniques through the investigation and formal reporting of an independent research project using meta-analysis, descriptive or experimental research design. Statistical methods and their implications for research will be studied, including populations and samples; organizing, displaying, and summarizing data; probability; normal distribution; tests of significance; correlation and simple regression; Z and T tests; and the chi square tests.

HHPS 597 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics

Health and Human Performance

Vipa Bernhardt
Associate Professor
B.A., B.S., Ph.D., University of Florida

Dean Culpepper
Assistant Professor
B.S., Berry College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Houston

Sandy Kimbrough
Professor
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M University
Texas A&M University System Graduate Faculty Member.

Sarah Mitchell
Assistant Professor
B.S., Angelo State University; M.S., University of Texas at Arlington; Ph.D. Texas Woman's University

Steven Prewitt
Associate Professor
B.S., George Fox University; M.S., University of Oregon; Ph.D., University of Utah

Elizabeth Wachira
Assistant Professor
B.S.N., University of Mary Hardin-Baylor; M.P.H., University of North Texas-Health Science Center; Ph.D. Texas Woman's University