College of Innovation and Design

Yvonne Villanueva-Russell (Dean)
Interim Department Head: Jared Pickens

Applied Arts and Sciences

The BAAS degree program prepares students for managerial careers in technical fields. This program offers a seamless transition from an associates of applied arts and sciences degree in technical fields earned from community colleges to a bachelor’s degree. Up to 85 semester hours may be transferred into the program, and the remaining courses may be completed online.

BAAS in Organizational Leadership

The Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences (BAAS) in Organizational Leadership degree at Texas A&M University-Commerce is a competency-based program that prepares innovative leaders for employment in an increasingly technological and global society. This program provides opportunities for you to receive credit for what you know and can do, allows you to accelerate completion of your degree, and because it is fully online, you are able to plan your study schedule around the rest of your day to complete the coursework.

BSCJ with Emphasis in Law Enforcement Leadership

The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with an emphasis in Law Enforcement Leadership (BSCJ-CJCB) at Texas A&M University-Commerce is a 100% online, competency-based program designed specifically for first responders: law enforcement, peace officers and military personnel with existing work experience, police academy training, or other certifications.  Courses are offered in an accelerated format, so students can move swiftly through material they already have mastery over, and focus more attention on topics that are new and challenging to their existing knowledge base.  The courses are self-paced, so students can work according to their own schedule.  Students in the BSCJ-CJCB program develop practical workplace competencies that meet current and future challenges facing first responders today.

General Studies B.G.S.

The Bachelor of General Studies (BGS) is a degree available through the College of Innovation and Design at Texas A&M University-Commerce. The degree provides maximum flexibility for students who have well-defined career objectives and wish to determine the content of their degree rather than pursue one of the established majors at A&M-Commerce. The degree program includes general education requirements and an area of concentration but not a specific major.

BAAS 301 - Principles of Applied Science
Hours: 3
The course is designed to provide students enhanced development opportunities for a broad array of principles, practices, and application skills common to contemporary business and industry. Emphasis on communication practices, techniques, and skills; career and educational building activities; and reading and writing activities related to the literature in the field of study. Students will be expected to participate in course activities, read related literature, conduct research on an assigned topics, and prepare written documents for evaluation.

BAAS 326 - Exploring Spreadsheets
Hours: 3
The purpose of this course is to prepare students to creatively use industry standard software. More than an introduction to these tools, this course will delve deeper into the intermediate skills necessary for today’s managers. Students will focus not only on using the basics of the software, but also on developing products using the software.

BAAS 345 - Leadership Techniques
Hours: 3
Provides a comprehensive and applied understanding of leadership and management functions to prepare individuals to effectively mentor and develop tomorrow’s leaders while leading and managing today’s organizations. Focuses on critical knowledge and skills necessary to carry out organizational goals and objectives. Prerequisites: Junior standing.

BAAS 351 - Financial Fitness: Planning, Budgeting, and Decision Making
Hours: 3
This course covers key components of financial leadership by exposing students to financial skills needed for professional and personal success. Emphasis on financial decision making, asset purchases, financing options, budgeting, and analysis and interpretation of financial data.

BAAS 408 - Problem Solving with Databases
Hours: 3
This course will bring advanced skills to students through data analysis and provide deep understanding of the results of the analysis. Using industry standard software tools, case studies will be utilized that will focus on real world organizational problems. Students will focus on identifying the problem, using software to produce results and defending those results through analysis. Prerequisites: BAAS 326.

BAAS 443 - Professional Standards
Hours: 3
Survey of contemporary professional standards including discussions of technical cultures and norms, benchmarking, sustainability, ethical criteria and ideas for corporate citizenship. Focuses on elements of work ethics with an emphasis on techniques to foster lifelong learning and collaborative growth. Statistical aspects of quality control and assurance.

BAAS 445 - Ethical Decision Making
Hours: 3
The study of strategies and interpersonal communication systems that provide today's management with accurate and quality information on which to base decisions and to be effective in the day to day negotiations within the business environment.

BAAS 489 - Independent Studies
Hours: 1-3
Independent Studies - Three semester hours Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite Consent of head. Note May be repeated when the topic varies.

BAAS 497 - SPECIAL TOPICS
Hours: 3
Special Topics. Three semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

BGS 401 - Globalization
Hours: 3
Globalization - Course provides coverage of a broad survey of global business issues; analyzes the environment in which global businesses operate. Prerequisites: : Junior/Senior.

BGS 402 - Research Methods
Hours: 3
Students will complete a project incorporating all disciplines from their individualized program, consisting of research, literature reviews, and information analysis resulting in a written or media product. Prerequisites: Junior/Senior.

BGS 404 - Organizational Dynamics and Diversity
Hours: 3
Diversity - Course will focus on building managerial skills to successful achieve organizational change through creativity, innovation and cultural diversity. Prerequisites: Junior/Senior.

BGS 405 - Sustainability in Contemporary Enterprise
Hours: 3
This is an advanced course on creating sustainability in the contemporary technical enterprise. It includes considerations of human and material resources and how they are required for maintaining, supporting, and managing technical and scientific enterprises or industry in the global environment with emphasis on the principles and strategies for maintaining sustainable practices and materials over the long-term. Topics include resource management, consumption, supply chain management, product development and production, distribution, packaging, waste management, and other environmental issues. Students will be expected to conduct research on assignment topics and to prepare written documents for evaluation.

BGS 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 0-4
Individualized instruction May be repeated when the topic varies.

BGS 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4
Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

CJCB 1301 - Introduction to Criminal Justice
Hours: 3
This course provides a historical and philosophical overview of the American criminal justice system, Including the nature, extent, and impact of crime; criminal law; and justice agencies and processes.

CJCB 1306 - Court Systems and Practices
Hours: 3
This course is a study of the court system as it applies to the structures, procedures, practices and sources of law in American courts, using federal and Texas statutes and case law.

CJCB 1307 - Crime in America
Hours: 3
American crime problems in historical perspective, social and public policy factors affecting crime, impact and crime trends, social characteristics of spe¬cific crimes, and prevention of crime.

CJCB 1310 - Fundamentals of Criminal Law
Hours: 3
This course is the study of criminal law including application of definitions, statutory elements, defenses and penalties using Texas statutes, the Model Penal Code, and case law. The course also analyzes the philosophical and historical development of criminal law and criminal culpability.

CJCB 1313 - Juvenile Justice System
Hours: 3
This course is a study of the juvenile justice process to include specialized juvenile law, role of the juvenile law, role of the juvenile courts, role of police agencies, role of correctional agencies, and theories concerning delinquency.

CJCB 2301 - Community Resources in Corrections
Hours: 3
This course is an introductory study of the role of the community in corrections; communi¬ty programs for adults and juveniles; administration of community programs; legal issues; and future trends in community treatment.

CJCB 2313 - Correctional Systems & Practices
Hours: 3
This course is a survey of institutional and non-institutional corrections. Emphasis will be placed on the organization and operation of correctional systems; treatment and rehabilitation; populations served; Constitutional issues; and current and future issues.

CJCB 2314 - Criminal Investigation
Hours: 3
This course examines theories and practices of the investigation process in the criminal justice system and analyzes information and application of operational techniques relating to crime scenes, forensic sciences, interviews, and interrogations; as well as, the study of issues concerning rules of evidence, trial testimony, and other constitutional processes.

CJCB 2323 - Aspects of Law Enforcement
Hours: 3
This course examines police authority; responsibilities; constitutional constraints; laws of arrest, search & seizure; and police liability.

CJCB 2328 - Police Systems & Practices
Hours: 3
This course examines the establishment, role and function of police in a democratic society. It will focus on types of police agencies and their organizational structure, police-community interaction, police ethics, and use of authority.

CJCB 100 - Orientation
Hours: 0
This course will serve as an orientation for those entering the CJCB program, highlighting the expectations and requirements of the program.

CJCB 302 - 21st Century Policing
Hours: 3
An introduction to policing strategies as best practices designed to help agencies promote effective crime reduction while building public trust and safeguarding officer well-being. Areas of emphasis are internal processes affecting culture, policy, administrative process, and training; as well as external processes affecting transparency, community engagement, and interactions with various populations.

CJCB 303 - Ethics, Values and Professionalism in Policing
Hours: 3
An examination of the nature and importance of police ethics and the factors that affect police integrity in today’s world, such as political factors and legal restrictions; all of which that would require professional communication skills and problem-solving strategies.

CJCB 304 - Critical Incident Decision Management
Hours: 3
This course helps prepare emergency response officials tasked with the critical incident command, specifically police operations, and provides them with the knowledge, skills and best practices and procedures essential to the effective and efficient planning and direction of such operations in crisis situations.

CJCB 305 - Communication
Hours: 3
This course concentrates on effective communication of law enforcement and criminal justice professionals for a range of audiences: the public, media, court officials, etc. Focusing on both oral and written communication, students will improve their general public speaking abilities, apply principles of de-escalation, and understand why communication is essential to the role of police in today’s society.

CJCB 306 - Officer Wellness
Hours: 3
Wellness, as a multi-dimensional phenomenon will be examined, including physical, emotional, mental well-being, especially as it relates to concerns associated with policing. Support resources for police, co-workers, family and significant others will also be explored.

CJCB 307 - Technical Writing
Hours: 1
This course teaches students to write documents for professional and general audiences, research reports, and other documents appropriate to the field of criminal justice.

CJCB 308 - Crime Analysis
Hours: 2
An introduction to Crime Analysis and an understanding of its application within smaller jurisdictions. Students learn how to design, fund, establish, and staff a crime analysis unit using evidence and statistical data for a smaller jurisdiction. This is a data analysis and applied statistics course that emphasizes interpretation and application of data rather than the calculation or algebra behind these numbers. Students will become familiar with common databases used by police organizations.

CJCB 309 - Procedural Justice
Hours: 3
Employing the four pillars of procedural justice, students will learn effective ways to increase public trust and confidence in police. This course will strengthen police legitimacy and communication competency with the community and special populations.

CJCB 402 - Leadership
Hours: 3
Managing a successful policing organization requires the application of strong interpersonal leadership skills to work effectively with people in a variety of roles. Students learn effective leadership strategies including improving communication, team effectiveness, change management, conflict resolution, and ethical decision-making practices.

CJCB 403 - Policing the Future
Hours: 3
This course will focus on cutting-edge developments in law enforcement, the problems they pose for policing and the agile management strategies necessary to address them. Topics such as crypto-currency and financial crimes will be presented. Policing strategies such as intelligence-led policing, predictive policing and new technologies that are leveraged to address these new challenges will be analyzed.

CJCB 404 - Critical Shift
Hours: 3
This course prepares students for changing role responsibilities and duties that are often experienced by law enforcement: different carrying out multiple job titles, lateral transfers, sworn and unsworn dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the mind and skill set necessary for being an effective manager, as well as building culture and motivating for high performance.

CJCB 405 - Evidence-Based Policing
Hours: 3
This course provides students with an analysis of how scientific evidence can be used to create proactive law enforcement decisions. Evidence-based strategy, problem-oriented policing and the implications of this for supervisor leadership roles will be discussed.

CJCB 406 - Implicit bias
Hours: 3
Students will build awareness to understand what unconscious bias is and why it matters. Students will develop skills to recognize and take action to manage bias. Emphasis will be placed on effective management strategies to work for inclusivity in the workplace and with the public.

CJCB 407 - Organizational Culture in Public Safety
Hours: 3
This course examines the interaction between leadership and organizational culture, with an emphasis on their relationship within law enforcement and criminal justice organizations. Develop a personal definition of leadership based on readings and self-disclosure inventories. Develop a clearer understanding of and ability to articulate one’s personal leadership philosophy with emphasis on providing options for future leadership opportunities.

CJCB 408 - Critical Thinking & Decision Making
Hours: 3
This course expands students’ knowledge of the thinking process that guides us through all the phases of generating and evaluating new ideas, and can help organizations solve problems using rational thought and logical decision-making. Students will acquire knowledge to apply to problem-solving and practice situations that enhance decision-making abilities, de-escalation situations, and conflict

CJCB 409 - Homeland Security/Terrorism
Hours: 3
This course prepares law enforcement professionals to face security problems posed by criminal and political terrorism - regionally, nationally, and internationally. It will identify various forms and typologies of terrorist activities, their consequences and preventive measures particularly relevant to criminal justice professionals, law enforcement and military personnel.

CJCB 499 - Capstone
Hours: 3
Students critically apply theories and evidence-based best practices learned to throughout the program to apply to contemporary challenges in urban policing and crime prevention including, but not limited to, police culture, patrol methods, the war on drugs, corruption, “broken windows”, use of force, race, police/community relations, and terrorism.

FLC 100 - Leadership
Hours: 2
Understand the multidisciplinary roots of leadership studies. Learn about the shift between industrial/post-industrial model and explore leadership myths and realities.

FLC 200 - Leadership
Hours: 2
Principles of Applied Leadership for Freshman Leadership Class - Two semester hours Understand the multidisciplinary roots of leadership studies. Learn about the shift between industrial/post-industrial model and explore leadership myths and realities.

ORGL 3311 - Issues in Organizational Leadership
Hours: 3
This course offers an overview of issues related to organizational leadership, including the definition of organizations, theories of leadership, and the characteristics and behaviors of leaders as well as varying contexts under which leaders must perform.

ORGL 3321 - Data Driven Decision Making I
Hours: 3
This two-term course examines the role of quantitative data in managerial and entrepreneurial decision-making. The course draws upon quantitative tools and analyses from several disciplines, especially, statistics, economics, accounting, and finance. The course study demonstrates the usefulness of these tools and analyses in providing optimal technical options in decision-making situations. The emphasis of the courses is on the interpretation and translation of data into information for the benefit of internal and external consumers. Prerequisites: ORGL 3311 or ORGL 3311 concurrent enrollment.

ORGL 3322 - Behavior, Ethics, Leadership I
Hours: 3
This course provides an examination of ethics in the workplace and the role of organizational leaders in fostering ethical behavior. Case studies, discussion, self-assessment exercises and reading assignments explore the basic frameworks of ethical dealings and moral leadership. Students will demonstrate a competency in critical thinking skills to both identify and remedy ethical issues typically encountered in organizational settings and interactions. Prerequisites: ORGL 3311 or ORGL 3311 concurrent enrollment.

ORGL 3331 - Data Driven Decision Making II
Hours: 3
This course examines the role of quantitative data in managerial and entrepreneurial decision-making. The course draws upon quantitative tools and analyses from several disciplines, especially, statistics, economics, accounting, and finance. The course study demonstrates the usefulness of these tools and analyses in providing optimal technical options in decision-making situations. The emphasis of the courses is on the interpretation and translation of data into information for the benefit of internal and external consumers. Prerequisites: ORGL 3321 or ORGL 3321 concurent enrollment.

ORGL 3332 - Behavior, Ethics, Leadership II
Hours: 3
This course provides an examination of ethics in the workplace and the role of organizational leaders in fostering ethical behavior. Case studies, discussion, self-assessment exercises and reading assignments explore the basic frameworks of ethical dealings and moral leadership. Students will demonstrate a competency in critical thinking skills to both identify and remedy ethical issues typicall encountered in organizational settings and interactions. Prerequisites: ORGL 3322 or ORGL 3322 concurrent enrollment.

ORGL 4341 - Leadership Theory I
Hours: 3
This course focuses on the principles and practice of management in an organizational setting. The course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills that can be used to analyze organizational processes and address challenges inherent in managing organizations, operations, and projects. Management theory is applied to practical problems in planning, organizing, leading, and controlling workplace situations and business activities. Prerequisites: ORGL 3331 or ORGL 3331 concurrent enrollment and ORGL 3332 or ORGL 3332 concurrent enrollment.

ORGL 4342 - Leadership Theory II
Hours: 3
This course focuses on the principles and practice of management in an organizational setting. The course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills that can be used to analyze organizational processes and address challenges inherent in managing organizations, operations, and projects. Management theory is applied to practical problems in planning, organizing, leading, and controlling workplace situations and business activities. Prerequisites: ORGL 4341 or ORGL 4341 concurrent enrollment and ORGL 4343 or ORGL 4343 concurrent enrollment.

ORGL 4343 - Leading Change
Hours: 3
This course offers in-depth analysis of prevalent issues related to organizational change. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: recognize and describe organizational change in varied organizations, explain and demonstrate behaviors/characteristics to establish credibility and legitimacy as a change agent and recognize the current dynamic social, political, and cultural environment for change and its potential impact on contemporary organizations. Prerequisites: ORGL 3331, ORGL 3332 and ORGL 4341 concurrent enrollment.

ORGL 4352 - Capstone I
Hours: 3
This course requires an analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of the student's knowledge and skills including academic performance, teamwork experience, and workplace experience. Using current information, technology and resources the student will construct a professional profile. Students use problem-solving skills to analyze, evaluate and recommend an implementation plan addressing an organizational leadership issue or problem. A main factor in evaluating student performance is the input from multiple stakeholders including employers and faculty. Prerequisites: Departmental approval required.

ORGL 4361 - Capstone II
Hours: 3
This course requires an analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of the student's knowledge and skills including academic performance, teamwork experience, and workplace experience. Using current information, technology and resources the student will construct a professional profile. Students use problem-solving skills to analyze, evaluate and recommend an implementation plan addressing an organizational leadership issue or problem. A main factor in evaluating student performance is the input from multiple stakeholders including employers and faculty. Prerequisites: ORGL 4352 or ORGL 4352 concurrent enrollment.

ORGL 100 - CBE - Orientation
Hours: 0

ORGL 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice
Hours: 3
In order to understand the application and function of the criminal justice program used within the United States, one needs to realize what constitutes a criminal offense, how crime is measured and monitored throughout this country, and the various types of theories of crime causation. During this course, students will research and review these three elements and then put each one of them in perspective by looking at the different avenues possible for corrections and the responsibilities of the courts. Finally, students will examine the current issues and challenges facing the justice system and what changes the future of criminal justice might hold.

ORGL 111 - Critical Thinking
Hours: 3
Critical thinking is a necessary skill for anyone to be able to problem solve including making clear decisions and conclusions. This course dissects the components of arguments and helps students interpret them based on their own perspectives. The students are introduced to the processes of logical reasoning to interpret arguments and learn how to evaluate the quality of reasoning behind arguments, interpretations, and/or beliefs.

ORGL 126 - Computer Information Systems
Hours: 3
In this course, students examine how an information system (IS) can manage a business' processes and organization, as well as the factors that can influence a business selection of their IS. Students also study how databases are used in business to collect data, the different methodologies used to develop an IS, its functional systems, and the fundamentals of communication and networking within a system and among multiple systems. Students also evaluate the Internet's impact on the use of IS in organizations. Finally, students study the variety of roles and responsibilities within an IS department and the role of management, as well as ethical considerations and how an organization must protect itself against system threats.

ORGL 130 - Introduction to Organizations
Hours: 3
This competency course examines the key components that make up the organizational environment. Students explore how organizations operate internally by looking at various concepts and functions such as ethics and determining what is right for an organization and its structure.

ORGL 145 - Customer Service
Hours: 1
This course will help prepare students for providing customer service in a variety of workplace situations

ORGL 197 - Special Topic
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

ORGL 201 - Supervision
Hours: 3
This course builds students’ understanding of supervising through real-life concepts, examples, and practice so they can apply what they’ve learned effectively on the job. The responsibilities and demands of a supervisor are ever changing as our workforce becomes more diverse in terms of race, gender, and ethnic background. This course teaches students how to adjust the challenges of technological change – and how to help their subordinates adapt. It gives students an overview of an increasingly competitive marketplace, resultant corporate restructuring, and workflow redesign.

ORGL 225 - Record Keeping for Leaders
Hours: 3
This competency course explores the foundational knowledge of record keeping, including recording transactions, understanding financial statements and long-term liabilities, cash flow and financial statement analysis, and other budgeting tools that impact decision making.

ORGL 231 - Macroeconomics
Hours: 3
Macroeconomic thought can help students make sense of the real-world economy that nearly everyone else participates in by explaining the flow of economic activity, fluctuations in the business cycle, investment and saving decisions, and government policy actions. The focus in this course is on applying macroeconomic thought to the real world and examining contemporary examples that demonstrate the relevance of macroeconomic concepts.

ORGL 232 - Microeconomics
Hours: 3
Microeconomic thought can help students make sense of the real-world economy by demonstrating how others make economic choices and how those choices interact to produce predictable, though often changing, outcomes in the real economy. The focus in this course is on applying microeconomic concepts and principles to the real world and examining contemporary examples that demonstrate the relevance of microeconomics for understanding the functioning of the real economy.

ORGL 297 - Special Topic
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

ORGL 302 - Statistics
Hours: 3
Statistics provide valuable information to us in our everyday lives. We are exposed to statistics in some form or another on a daily basis. Research studies and political topics presented by news sources often include statistics. Statistics about industries and the behavior of consumers shape the outlook and operational decisions of businesses. By learning the concepts of statistics and how you can evaluate data statistically, you obtain information that you can use to make informed decisions.

ORGL 305 - Organizational Behavior
Hours: 3
This course first examines organizational theory and application. Students then explore the business environment through organizational structures and their behavioral characteristics. These include management issues, ethical issues, challenges and effective communication, leadership, power, and management, the design of the organization, the impact of that design, and the impact of an organization's culture. From the knowledge gained from this course, students can confidently address the management issues presented and lead organizations towards success.

ORGL 336 - Organizational Communication
Hours: 3
This competency course focuses on how organizations communicate with multiple audiences and examines the function and structure of communication in both formal and informal situations.

ORGL 337 - Dynamics of Organizations
Hours: 3
This competency course first examines organizational theory and application. Students then explore environment through organizational structures and their behavioral characteristics. These include management issues, ethical issues, challenges and effective communication, leadership, power, and management, the design of the organization, the impact of that design, and the impact of an organization's culture.

ORGL 338 - Talent Leadership
Hours: 3
This competency course explores the different roles that the HR department plays in organizations and the skills needed to accomplish day-to-day activities of HR personnel.

ORGL 339 - Legal Issues in Organizations
Hours: 3
This competency course will explore legal issues in organizations including torts, crimes, intellectual property, contracts, negotiable instruments, agency, employment, as well as the law with respect to ethics and social responsibility, government regulation, personal property, real property, and international trade.

ORGL 346 - Financial Performance in Organizations
Hours: 3
This competency course explores the foundational knowledge of leading organizations to improved financial performance, including key language and terminology, and the application of the various financial tools that impact financial decision making.

ORGL 347 - Research Methods
Hours: 3
This course introduces the fundamentals of qualitative research methods, which include finding an original research question, assessing appropriate methods of data collection, recording data, and drawing reliable conclusions about the research questions through a research project. By practicing a systematic approach to conducting qualitative research, students can extend the same systematic approach to any type of research encountered.

ORGL 389 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours.

ORGL 397 - Special Topic
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

ORGL 422 - Project Leadership
Hours: 3
This competency course explores leadership’s responsibility for conceiving, designing, implementing and managing the organization's overall objectives, culture, and environment as part of the project management process. Within this context, the course primarily focuses on understanding project management, aligning project management with the organization, project management oversight, projects as capital investments, globalization and resources optimization.

ORGL 431 - Developing Globally Competent Leaders
Hours: 3
This competency course dissects the components of global competence and helps students to interpret them in relation to the critical role of leadership. Students are introduced to a wide variety of resources that have been shown to improve levels of global competence. Upon completion of the course, students are expected to better interpret and understand their own strengths and development areas that may benefit from further study and attention.

ORGL 432 - Environmental Regulation & Compliance
Hours: 3
In this competency course, students will gain an overview of the environmental laws enacted by Congress and of the subsequent environmental regulations established by the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency). Students will also gain an understanding of how to keep abreast of regulatory changes and how to navigate through and locate among the vast maze-like array of regulations those that are specific to an organization.

ORGL 433 - Power & Politics in Organizations
Hours: 3
This competency course explores the sources of power in organizations and the circumstances that lead to its attainment and effective use.

ORGL 434 - Resource Development
Hours: 3
This competency course will explore important resource development issues facing non-profit organizations including grant writing and fundraising.

ORGL 435 - Leading High Performance Teams
Hours: 3
This competency course explores the necessary skills, techniques and frameworks leaders need to build and effectively lead a high-performance team.

ORGL 440 - Organizational Strategies
Hours: 3
This competency course focuses on the specifics of organizational strategies and provides a framework for formulating successful and adaptive strategies in an increasingly complex world economy.

ORGL 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours.

ORGL 497 - Special Topic
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

UNCO 1301 - Signature Course
Hours: 3
A Signature Course at Texas A&M University- Commerce offers first-year students the opportunity to explore unique topics in engaging learning environments. Students develop college-level skills in communication, critical thinking, and social responsibility through a rigorous intellectual experience.

UNCO 2301 - University Engagement and Applied Leadership
Hours: 0
This course is for students who serve as mentors to first-year students. In this course, students will learn theories of leadership, how to apply their leadership skills in their mentor groups, and will receive training to on important topics relevant to university leadership and engagement including inclusivity, mental health, information literacy, Title IX, working with students who require educational accommodations, et cetera.

UNCO 101 - First-Year TRAC Mentor House Meeting
Hours: 0
Meeting time for first-year students assigned to a mentor house.

UNCO 111 - Critical Thinking
Hours: 1-3
Critical Thinking - One semester hour This course introduces students to theories of learning and critical thinking and provides a learning framework to apply them to their college and life experiences. Concepts studies include research and theory on how people learn, critical thinking, problem solving, perception, learning styles, memory, creativity, and how attitudes and values affect the learning and thinking processes. The course also shows students how to apply these theories and research findings to help develop practical skills in critical thinking, time management, reading, note taking, testing taking, other areas that will help them be more successful students and lifelong learners.

Grady Price Blount
Professor
B.S., Corpus Christi State University; M.S., Sul Ross State University; Ph.D., Arizona State University

Robert Brown
Assistant Professional Track Faculty
B.S., M.A., Texas A & M University-Commerce

Misty Lair
Director
B.S., M.S., Texas A&M University-Commerce

Tina Lancaster
Instructor
B.S., M.S., Texas A&M University-Commerce

Theresa Sadler
Lecturer
B.S., M.S., Texas A&M University-Commerce.

George Swindell
Assistant Professional Track Faculty
B.S., M.S., Texas A&M University-Commerce

Annette Taggart
Instructor
B.B.A., M.B.A., Texas A&M University-Commerce