Engineering & Technology

Andrea Graham (Interim Department Head)
Location: AG/IT Building, Room 213, 903-886-5474, Fax 903-886-5960
Engineering & Technology Web Site: http://www.tamuc.edu/et

Mission: Practical Ingenuity
The framework of the Department of Engineering & Technology, built upon instruction, research, and infusion of real-world experiences, fosters the development of effective problem solvers.

The Department of Engineering & Technology offers Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree programs leading to career opportunities in technical management, supervision, engineering, manufacturing and construction. Majors offered include: Technology Management, Construction Engineering, and Industrial Engineering.

Engineering & Technology majors are required to complete the Core Curriculum Requirements and major area requirements. For a course to transfer into an E&T major, a grade of “C” or better must be earned in the course. A grade of “C” or better is required in all E&T major and required support courses. Courses must be repeated if a grade of “C” or better is not earned in the course.

CONE 211 - Statics
Hours: 3
General principles of mechanics; concurrent force systems; statics of particles; equivalent force/moment systems; centroids and center of gravity; equilibrium of rigid bodies; trusses, frames, internal forces in structural members; friction; second moments of areas. Prerequisites: PHYS 2425.

CONE 212 - Dynamics
Hours: 3
Kinematics and kinetics of individual particles and systems of particles utilizing Newton’s Laws of Motion, the Principle of Work and Energy, and the Principle of Impulse and Momentum; steady and variable mass flow. Prerequisites: MATH 192.

CONE 221 - Building Construction
Hours: 3
A study of the construction materials and methods used in commercial building projects. Students will examine the selection, acquisition, and utilization of concrete, steel, masonry and wood in a variety of building projects. The course will include introduction to blueprint reading, quantity takeoff, mechanical and electrical systems of building projects. Prerequisites: ENGR 210 or PHYS 2425.

CONE 321 - Construction Estimating
Hours: 3
Study of the principles and application of construction estimating including quantity takeoff, pricing of materials, classification of work, labor, overhead, specifications, bid procedures, and project scheduling. Students will be introduced to computerized estimating and scheduling software. Prerequisites: CONE 221 and ENGR 207.

CONE 322 - Construction Planning and Scheduling
Hours: 3
A study of planning and scheduling of time, costs, and other resources for a construction project. Computerized scheduling software will be introduced. Prerequisites: CONE 321.

CONE 331 - Mechanics of Materials
Hours: 3
Applications of conservation principles and stress/deformation relationships for continuous media to structural members; axially loaded members; thin-walled pressure vessels; torsional and flexural members; shear; moment; deflection of members; combined loadings; stability of columns; nonsymmetrical bending, shear center; indeterminate members; elastic foundations. Prerequisites: CONE 211 and CONE 221.

CONE 332 - Structural Analysis and Design
Hours: 3
Functions of structure, design loads, reactions and force systems; analysis of statically determinate structures including beams, trusses and arches; energy methods of determining deflections of structures; influence lines and criteria for moving loads; analysis of statically indeterminate structures including continuous beams and frames. Prerequisites: CONE 331.

CONE 341 - Engineering Hydrology & Hydraulics
Hours: 3
Design of water distribution systems and open channels; selection of pumps and turbines; hydraulics of wells; basic engineering hydrology including precipitation, infiltration, runoff, flood routing, fluid flow in pipe, statistical measures and water resources planning. Prerequisites: CONE 331.

CONE 351 - Surveying for Construction
Hours: 3
Surveying techniques and procedures used in engineering projects. Surveying instruments, topographic maps, building site layout, route surveying, precision, significant figures, errors, and closure. Prerequisites: MATH 315.

CONE 411 - Steel & Concrete Design
Hours: 3
Planning and field engineering for concrete and steel construction. Structural mechanics of concrete beams, slabs, columns, walls and footings. Steel structures including tension members, compression members, flexural members, connections, and building codes. Prerequisites: CONE 332 with a minimum grade of C.

CONE 413 - Design and Construction of Steel Structures
Hours: 3
Design and construction of steel structures including tension members, compression members, flexural members, and connections utilizing the building codes. Prerequisites: CONE 332 with a minimum of C.

CONE 414 - Design and Construction of Concrete Structures
Hours: 3
Design and construction of concrete structures including reinforced concrete beams, slabs, columns, walls and footings utilizing the building codes Prerequisites: CONE 332 with a minimum grade of C.

CONE 421 - Construction Safety
Hours: 3
Safety and loss control concepts, practices, and skills to improve construction job site safety; OSHA regulations, accidents, documentation, safety policies and procedures, safe work environments, crisis management, risk management, and other safety related topics.

CONE 422 - Construction Project Management
Hours: 3
This course includes project scope management; project time management; project cost management; project human resource management; project communications management; project risk management; and project procurement management Prerequisites: CONE 322.

CONE 423 - Contracts & Specifications
Hours: 3
This course will examine the legal and contractual aspects of construction, types of construction contracts, contractual relationships among different parties, construction administration, construction insurance, concepts in value engineering, professional ethics, and construction safety issues. Prerequisites: CONE 422.

CONE 424 - Construction Accounting and Financial Management
Hours: 3
Students will have an integrated overview of finance, costs, revenues, and expenditures at the construction company and project level. Prerequisites: CONE 422.

CONE 431 - Sustainable Construction Methods and Processes
Hours: 3
Sustainable construction materials and methodologies related to commercial construction, including LEED/Green certifications. Prerequisites: CONE 422.

CONE 432 - Design and Construction of Foundations
Hours: 3
Determination of civil engineering properties of soil and their behavior, identification, grain size analysis, compaction, permeability, consolidation, and shear strength. Attention is given to foundation system selection, design, and construction methods Prerequisites: CONE 332.

CONE 441 - Highway and Heavy Construction
Hours: 3
Highway planning, driver characteristics, geometric design, traffic flow and control, highway materials, pavement design, and how highways are constructed, maintained, and upgraded. Students will apply the knowledge of estimating and scheduling to heavy construction projects such as highways, bridges, approaches, pipelines, or related structures. Prerequisites: CONE 321 and CONE 351.

CONE 470 - Preparation for Construction Engineering Capstone Project
Hours: 3
All phases of the capstone project are developed as a team, including preliminary engineering design process, construction constraints, interaction with clients, identification of engineering problems, developments of proposal, identification of design criteria, cost estimating, planning and scheduling, application of codes and standards, development of alternatives and selection of best alternative. All deliverables are identified. Prerequisites: Department Approval.

CONE 471 - Construction Engineering Capstone Project
Hours: 3
Application of team design concepts to the capstone project Prerequisite:Department approval.

CONE 491 - H Ind Honors Reading
Hours: 3
Individual Honors Reading.

EE 210 - Digital Circuits
Hours: 3
Theory and design of digital logic circuits, including number systems, Boolean algebra, logic gates, combinational circuit design and analysis, Karnaugh maps, truth tables, logic optimization, arithmetic circuits, flip-flops, counters, synchronous and asynchronous state machines, and introduction to programmable logic. Pre-requisite: PHYS 2426 or concurrent enrollment.

EE 220 - Circuit Theory
Hours: 3
Theory and principles of electrical circuits. Basic circuit elements, resistance, capacitance, and inductance. Electrical circuit laws, DC analysis, AC analysis, network theorems, RLC networks, topology of electrical networks, sinusoidal steady-state analysis, operational amplifiers, and introduction to frequency domain analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 192 with a minimum grade of C, PHYS 2426 with a minimum grade of C.

EE 310 - Digital Systems /Embedded Control
Hours: 3
Microcontroller and/or microprocessor architecture and applications. Introduction to Assembly language programming. Prerequisites: CSCI 151 with a minimum grade of C, EE 210 with a minimum grade of C.

EE 320 - Electronics I
Hours: 3
Characteristics of semiconductor devices; diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and field-effect transistors. Models for electronic devices and circuits. Analysis of diode, transistor, and low frequency amplifier circuits. Prerequisites: EE 220 with a minimum grade of C.

EE 321 - Electronics II
Hours: 3
Low and high frequency models for diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and field-effect transistors. Analysis of active filters, differential and multistage amplifiers, feedback circuits, and oscillators. Prerequisites: EE 320 with a minimum grade of C.

EE 330 - Continuous Signals and Systems
Hours: 3
Continuous-time signal processing and communication systems. Time and frequency domain analysis, Fourier series and transformations, Laplace transform, modulation techniques including amplitude modulation, frequency modulation and phase modulation. Signal and noise modeling using probabilistic descriptions. Prerequisites: EE 220 with a minimum grade of C, MATH 315 with a minimum grade of C.

EE 340 - Electromagnetics
Hours: 3
General characteristics of electric and magnetic fields. Maxwell’s Equations, electromagnetic wave propagation, transmission lines, Smith Charts, impedance matching, waveguides, and antenna fundamentals. Prerequisites: PHYS 2426 with a minimum grade of C, MATH 315 with a minimum grade of C.

EE 430 - Discrete Signals & Systems
Hours: 3
Discrete-time systems and digital communications. Discrete-time systems, stability analysis, Fourier series representation of discrete-time systems, discrete Fourier transform, convolution, z-transform, digital filters, digital communications, Amplitude Shift Keying (ASK), Frequency Shift Keying (FSK), Phase Shift Keying (PSK). Prerequisites: EE 330 with a minimum grade of C.

EE 433 - Digital Signal Processing
Hours: 3
Fundamentals of digital signal processing, theory and classification of digital filters including Fast Fourier transform (FFT), finite impulse response (FIR) filters, infinite impulse response (IIR) filters, optimization approaches. Prerequisites: EE 430 with a minimum grade of C.

EE 435 - Control Systems
Hours: 3
Control systems. System modeling, performance, and stability. Analyses of closed loop systems using frequency response, root locus, Bode diagram, Nyquist plot, and state variable techniques. Prerequisites: EE 430 with a minimum grade of C.

EE 440 - Power
Hours: 3
Principles of power systems. Single phase and three phase, transmission and distribution, voltage regulation, transformers, motors, and generators. Prerequisites: EE 340 with a minimum grade of C.

EE 450 - Advanced Digital Signal Processing
Hours: 3
Selected advanced topics in digital signal processing. Prerequisites: EE 433 with a minimum grade of C.

EE 451 - Digital Systems Design
Hours: 3
Digital system design course. Student teams will design, test, and implement a digital system given a set of design constraints. Prerequisites: EE 310 wth a minimum grade of C, EE 330 with a minimum grade of C.

EE 452 - Antenna Theory and Design
Hours: 3
Antenna theory and design, including performance and analysis. Prerequisites: EE 340 with a minimum grade of C.

EE 453 - RF Networks
Hours: 3
Radio Frequency (RF) and microwave circuit design and analysis. Transmission lines, impedance matching, Smith charts. Prerequisites: EE 321 with a minimum grade of C, EE 340 with a minimum grade of C.

EE 454 - Power Electronics
Hours: 3
Power electronic devices operation and characteristics. Rectifiers, converters, inverters, power supplies. Prerequisites: EE 321 with a minimum grade of C.

EE 455 - Digital Design with HDL
Hours: 3
Design and simulation of digital systems using Hardware Description Languages (HDL). Prerequisites: EE 310 with a minimum grade of C.

EE 470 - Capstone Design / Internship I
Hours: 3
First half of the senior engineering capstone design project. Student teams will be engage in a preliminary engineering design process including: design constraints, interaction with clients, identification of engineering problems, development of a design proposal, identification of design criteria, cost estimating, planning, and scheduling. Prerequisites: Senior Classification, EE Majors only. Course must be scheduled in the fall semester prior to the final spring semester before graduation and Instructor's consent.

EE 471 - Capstone Design/Internship II
Hours: 3
Second half of the senior engineering capstone design project. Application of team preliminary design concepts developed in EE 470 to the capstone project. Prerequisites: Senior Classification, EE Majors only. Course must be scheduled the final spring semester of graduation and Instructor's consent.

EE 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-3
One to Three semester hours Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies.

EE 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 3
Special Topics in Electrical Engineering. Three semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topic varies.

ENGR 102 - Introduction to Engineering
Hours: 3
An introduction to engineering with emphasis on development and design processes. Interpretation of product/customer specifications, concept development, engineering drawings, design for prototyping, and manufacturing will be introduced through a hands-on team-based engineering project design.

ENGR 110 - Introduction to Engineering and Technology
Hours: 3
This course provides a solid foundation in fundamental skills needed for freshmen and transfer students to academically succeed and professionally prepare them for challenges within the disciplines of Engineering and Technology Management. The project-based assignments will provide students with opportunities to apply mathematics to solve engineering problems, acquire team working skills, practice written and verbal communication skills, and enhance problem solving and design skills. Early understanding of these skills will assist students throughout their undergraduate experience. Prerequisites: MATH 142, or concurrent enrollment.

ENGR 111 - Computer-Aided Design (CAD)
Hours: 3
This is an introductory course in computer-aided drafting/design. Students will be taught basic CAD commands, tools, multi-view drawing and dimensioning techniques.

ENGR 113 - Product Design and Development
Hours: 3
This course includes the study of product development and design processes and methods, including product specifications, concept development, engineering drawings, design for prototyping, and manufacturing. Prerequisites: IT 111.

ENGR 201 - Computing for Engineers
Hours: 3
The purpose of this class is to introduce students to the basic fundamentals of how to identify, formulate and analyze problems based on the knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering by using modern computing techniques. Concepts gained will pave the way to more advanced problem framing and selection of appropriate programming computing approaches. Students will solve problems using a database management system and an electronic spreadsheet. Prerequisites: MATH 2413.

ENGR 207 - Engineering Economic Analysis
Hours: 3
Emphasizes the systematic evaluation of the costs and benefits associated with proposed technical projects. The student will be exposed to the concepts of the "time value of money" and the methods of discounted cash flow. Students are prepared to make decisions regarding money as capital within a technological or engineering environment. Prerequisites: IE 201.

ENGR 210 - Engineering Mechanics - Statics and Dynamics
Hours: 3
This course will focus on equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; centroids and center of gravity; internal forces of trusses, frames, and machines; internal forces in structural members; friction; second moment of areas; kinematics and kinetics of individual and systems of particles; principles of work and energy, and impulse and momentum; steady and variable mass flow. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: PHYS 2425.

ENGR 213 - Engineering Statistics
Hours: 3
This course covers the role of statistics in engineering, probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, joint probability distributions, random sampling and data description, point estimation, statistical intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and linear regression. Prerequisites: MATH 192 or concurrent enrollment.

ENGR 411 - Engineering Management
Hours: 3
Techniques relating to managing engineering activities; project management with Pert/CPM; engineer's transition into management; engineering managerial functions; motivation of individual and group behavior; productivity assessment/improvement; managing the quality function and communications. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Senior classification.

IE 221 - General Metal
Hours: 4

IE 305 - Facilities Planning & Management
Hours: 3
Study of production facilities, including location, planning, design and maintenance. Emphasis on production systems, machine selection, automation, material handling, storage and warehousing, quality, retrofitting and preventative maintenance. Prerequisites: MATH 335.

IE 311 - Data Analytics
Hours: 3
This course emphasizes the application of statistical tools to real-world problems. You will learn how to process, analyze and visualize large data sets. The topics include statistical data analysis, multiple regression, design of experiment, big data and neural networks. Prerequisites: Lvl U IE 211 Min Grade C or Lvl U ENGR 213 Min Grade C.

IE 312 - Industrial Operations Research
Hours: 3
This course focuses on the application of linear programming techniques. Most of the mathematic models presented in the course are normal prescriptive or optimization applications. The models include the Diet, Work-Scheduling, Capital Budgeting, Short-Term Financial Planning, Blending, Multi-period Decision (Inventory model), Multi-period Financial Model, and Multi-period Work Scheduling. The course includes discussions of the simplex algorithm and other methods to derive solutions for the above models. The Excel Solver software is also used in the course to solve linear programming problems. Discussions (Sensitivity Analysis) are included as to how changes or variations in a linear programming’s parameters affect the optimal solution. Prerequisites: MATH 335.

IE 313 - Industrial Operations Research II
Hours: 3
This course focuses on the application of linear programming techniques. The models included in this course are Transportation, Assignment and Transshipment. The network models (Shortest Path; Maximum-Flow; Minimum-Cost; and CPM and Pert) are included. The course includes formulating integer programming problems. Prerequisites: IE 312.

IE 314 - Statistical Quality Control
Hours: 3
A comprehensive coverage of modern quality control techniques to include the design of statistical process control systems, acceptance sampling, and process improvement. Prerequisites: IE 311.

IE 316 - Manufacturing Systems Design and Control
Hours: 3
Advanced course emphasizing the analysis and design of job requirements, workplace arrangements, material handling devices/systems and machine controls which improve the human workplace. Students will research and create a system design project. Prerequisites: IE 311 and MATH 2413.

IE 318 - Analysis of Production Systems
Hours: 3
Analytical principles of production systems analysis and control; emphasis placed on stochastic analysis; role of variability and impact on cycle time; push versus pull production strategies; inventory models; production planning and scheduling; queuing models. Prerequisites: IE 311 and IE 312.

IE 397 - Special Topics
Hours: 3
Special Topics. Three semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topic varies.

IE 403 - Human Factors Engineering
Hours: 3
The emphasis of this course is the design of the human-system interface. The principles of the life sciences, engineering, and mathematics are applied to the investigation of existing and proposed socio-technical systems. Methods for the reduction of fatigue and human error are taught. Prerequisites: Lvl U IE 211 Min Grade C or Lvl U ENGR 213 Min Grade C.

IE 407 - Production Systems Operations
Hours: 3
Analytical principles of manufacturing systems design, analysis and control; emphasis placed on stochastic analysis; role of variability and impact on cycle time; push versus pull production strategies including Kanban and constant WIP control; probability, queueing theory, Little's Law, heavy traffic approximation and queueing networks. Prerequisites: IE 316.

IE 409 - Work Design
Hours: 3
Advanced course emphasizing the analysis and design of job requirements, workplace arrangements, human-machine system design processes and principles which improve the human workplace. Students will research and create a system design project. Prerequisites: IE 318.

IE 410 - Systems Simulation
Hours: 3
The application of simulation to facilities layout for manufacturing industries, service business models, entertainment and crisis management is emphasized. Areas covered include system structure, system analysis, model construction, data collection, and computer simulation languages. Prerequisites: IE 311.

IE 431 - Manufacturing Support Systems
Hours: 3
Concepts and principles of automation and automation control, including sensors, actuators, process variable conversion, programmable logic controllers (PLCs), logic controllers, microcontrollers, industrial robotics, NC technology, and flexible manufacturing systems. Prerequisites: Phys. 2426 with a minimum of C.

IE 444 - Systems Engineering
Hours: 3
A study of the systems acquisition life cycle, contract negotiations, life cycle cost (LCC) analyses, project cost estimation, project schedule and tracking techniques, reliability and maintainability (R&M) analyses, trade off analyses, test and evaluation (T&E), design for maintainability, design for manufacturability, design for manageability. Prerequisites: Senior classification in Industrial Engineering and instructor's consent.

IE 471 - Planning for Industrial System Design
Hours: 3
This course is a precursor for IE 495. Each student will enroll the following spring in IE 495 and as member of a student team. The objective of the course is for each team to prepare a proposal (technical and management sections) to outline the approach and methodology that the team plans to follow in working with industry sponsors on real-world industrial engineering process improvement activities. The proposed improvement activity will be the systems design project planned for the following spring semester in IE 495 Industrial Systems Design. The proposal prepared during this class is intended to present: the background for the problem, statement and description of the problem, the approach, the methodology and analytical support of the team's plans for the execution of the project. Prerequisites: IE 312 or IE 313, Senior Classification, IE Majors only, Course must be scheduled in the fall semester prior to the student's IE 495 enrollment in the final spring semester and Instructor's consent.

IE 486 - Service Systems Analysis
Hours: 3
This course focuses on analyses and visualization of engineering issues faced by service industries contrasted against production and manufacturing industries, service business models, development of support facility requirements, technological tools used in serving various business, and metrics to measure quality of services. IE Major. Course scheduled in the final semester of the student's IE Program. Prerequisites: Senior Classification. Corequisites: IE 495.

IE 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-3
Independent Study. One to Three semester hours Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies.

IE 490 - H HONORS THESIS
Hours: 1-6

IE 491 - Honors Reading
Hours: 3

IE 495 - Industrial Systems Design
Hours: 3
This course is the Industrial Engineering Capstone Design course, covering: flexible manufacturing systems and manufacturing integration; integrated knowledge to be gained from using all required industrial engineering courses in a system design project. Laboratory component will be used to reinforce team activities by working with industry sponsors on real-world industrial engineering process improvement activities. Prerequisites: IE 411 and IE 471; Senior classification in Industrial Engineering and instructor's consent. Corequisites: IE 486.

IE 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 3
Special Topics. Three semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topic varies.

TMGT 240 - Quality in Technology Management
Hours: 3
This course is designed to provide the student with tools for quality in technology management, including continuous improvement, quality measurement systems, problem solving, system failure analysis, and corrective actions. Some of the concepts that are addressed are Customer Satisfaction, Process and Quality Standards, and Quality Control Activities. These topics include advanced quality systems such as six sigma, ISO 9001 (manufacturing excellence), change management, regulatory affairs, industry specific quality standards (ISO 13485, ISO / IEC 17025, Food Safety), and Root Cause Analysis.

TMGT 303 - Technical Communications
Hours: 3
This course is a study and application of technical writing documents, letters, manuals and reports. Emphasis is also placed on presentations, team building, employee training, interviewing, business etiquette and professionalism. (This course is 100 % online) Prerequisites: Junior standing.

TMGT 311 - Environmental and Safety Management
Hours: 3
The main goal of this course is to study the history and application of OSHA and EPA regulations and regulatory effects on program management. Safety and environmental management and its organizational impact will be emphasized. Hazard assessment, prevention, and control will be other key points of the course. Prerequisites: Junior Standing.

TMGT 335 - Managing Sustainability
Hours: 3
This course is designed to provide the student with an inclusive understanding of the management of three aspects of sustainability: environmental, economic, and social impacts. It will emphasize the methods and techniques of incorporating sustainability factors into any management decision. It is the study of globally accepted green rating systems, green policies, and sustainably built environments. Prerequisites: TMGT 311.

TMGT 336 - Construction Cost Estimating
Hours: 3
Study of the principles and application of construction estimating including quantity takeoff, pricing of materials, classification of work, labor, overhead, specifications, bid procedures, and project scheduling. Prerequisites: MATH 142 or MATH 176.

TMGT 340 - Managerial Statistics
Hours: 3
Explores methods of collecting, analyzing and interpreting data for managerial decision making. Includes data presentation, measures of central tendency, dispersion, and skewness; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling methods and sampling distributions; and confidence interval estimation of parameters and tests of hypotheses. Prerequisites: TMGT 240.

TMGT 350 - Principles of Technology Management
Hours: 4
Study of leadership and management methodologies necessary to be successful and effective in contemporary technology intensive organizations. Prerequisites: TMGT 303.

TMGT 351 - GLB/Organizational Behavior
Hours: 3
This course is designed to provide the student with a better understanding of how individuals, teams, and organizations function effectively in technologically advanced and culturally diverse work environments. It will emphasize the role of leaders in organizations, best leadership practices, and future leadership trends and change management. Prerequisites: TMGT 303.

TMGT 352 - Principles of Cost Engineering
Hours: 3
Cost engineering is concerned with the application of scientific principles and techniques to problems of cost estimating, cost control, business planning and management science, profitability analysis, project management, and planning and scheduling. Prerequisites: ACCT 221.

TMGT 358 - Essentials of Project Management
Hours: 3
This course develops a foundation of concepts and solutions that supports the planning, scheduling, controlling, resource allocation, and performance measurement activities required for successful completion of a project. Basic project management tools will be introduced. Prerequisites: Junior Standing.

TMGT 411 - Risk Management
Hours: 3
This course explores the management of risk including environmental, occupational, financial, security, disaster, risk to the corporate image, and other risks. Prevention, mitigation, and transference of risk are presented. Prerequisites: TMGT 311.

TMGT 439 - Construction Management
Hours: 3
Study of construction operations, project management and project planning. Includes scheduling, rough diagram preparation, calculating costs, presentations, and controlling. Prerequisites: TMGT 352 and senior standing.

TMGT 444 - Decision Theory
Hours: 3
Decision theory deals with methods for determining the optimal course of action when a number of alternatives are available and their consequences cannot be forecast with certainty. This course will use quantitative methods (models) for problem solving and decision making. Theories and models to be covered include probability theory, utility theory and game theory, linear programming models, nonlinear programming models, and integer programming models. Prerequisites:TMGT 340 and TMGT 411.

TMGT 454 - Contracts & Specifications
Hours: 3
Principles and analysis of construction contracts and specifications. Additional aspects of construction management will be included. Prerequisites: MGT 301 with a minimum grade of C.

TMGT 455 - Project Planning & Scheduling
Hours: 3
Study of the concepts used in planning and scheduling of projects in both industrial and construction applications. Prerequisites: TMGT 352.

TMGT 456 - Value Chain Control & Management
Hours: 3
Value chain is a high-level management model of how businesses receive raw materials as input, add value to the raw materials through various processes, and sell finished products to customers. Prerequisites: TMGT 350.

TMGT 457 - Decision Making for Emerging Technologies
Hours: 3
This course will explore current breakthrough technologies and disruptive innovations that have emerged over the past few years. A close examination will be conducted to understand the importance of management strategy in navigating the rapid climate of changing technology to ensure a company’s success. Prerequisites: Senior Standing. Instructor approval.

TMGT 458 - Project Management
Hours: 3
The course covers key components of project management including project integration, project scope management, project time and cost management, quality management, human resource considerations, communications, risk management, and procurement management. Corequisites: TMGT 471.

TMGT 471 - Technology Management Capstone Project
Hours: 4
This is the capstone course for the Technology Management Program. It provides the opportunity for students to demonstrate that they have learned the material from the program and can apply it in the real world. It should be taken during students’ last semester. It provides students the opportunity to develop a plan to solve a problem dealing with technology management issues today. Prerequisites: BS-TMGT Majors only, senior standing, and final semester.

TMGT 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-3
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

Burchan Aydin
Assistant Professor
B.S., Middle East Technical University; M.A.A., University of the Incarnate World; Ph.D., Texas Tech University

Patrick Carter
Distinguished Lecturer
B.S., Louisiana Tech University; M.S., Southern Methodist University; M.B.A., University of Dallas

Jason Davis
Associate Professor
B.S., M.S., East Texas State University; Ph.D., Colorado State University.

Brent Donham
Dean
B.S., New Mexico State University; M.S., Stanford University; Ed.D, Texas A&M University-Commerce

Andrea Graham
Assistant Professor and Interim Department Head
B.S., Tuskegee University; M.S. Stevens Institute of Technology; Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington

Yoon Duk (Debbie) Kim
Assistant Professor
B.S., Hanyang University; M.S., Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology

Sojung Kim
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., Dongguk University, Seoul, Korea,; Ph.D., University of Arizona

Perry Moler
Instructor;Safety Officer
B.S.,Texas A&M University-Commerce, MS., Texas A&M University-Commerce

Ilseok (Eddie) Oh
Associate Professor
B.S., Hanyang University; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State University

Marcus Smith
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., Missouri University of Science & Technology; D.B.A., University of the Incarnate Word

Mahdi (Marty) Yaqub
Assistant Professor
B.S., Southern Illinois University; M.S., San Jose State University; E.D., Santa Clara University; Ph.D., George Washington University