Biological and Environmental Sciences

Judith Ball (Department Head)
Location: Science Building, Room 260, 903-886-5378, Fax 903-886-5997
Biological and Environmental Sciences Web Site: http://www.tamuc.edu/academics/colleges/scienceEngineeringAgriculture/departments/biologicalEnvironmentalSciences/default.aspx

The Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences offers the Bachelor of Sciences and the Bachelor of Arts in Biological Sciences, Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science, and Bachelor of Science in Wildlife and Conservation Science. The department also offers minors in Biology and Environmental Sciences. The programs include teacher certification in 8-12 life science and pre-professional programs in medicine, allied health, pharmacy, dentistry, osteopathy, optometry, nursing, medical technology, and physical therapy.

Graduate programs in the Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences include a Master of Science degree in Biological Sciences (including a fully online MS degree in Biological Sciences), and an online Graduate Certificate in Environmental Sciences.

Graduates from the department are academically prepared for graduate schools and for careers in education, industry, and government.

Students seeking a bachelor’s degree in the following majors must complete:

  1. degree requirements for a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree, and
  2. Core Curriculum Requirements (refer to those sections of this catalog).

II. Major in Biological Sciences

The Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences offers a general degree in the biological sciences.  This program provides a comprehensive overview of biological sciences, working from the molecular level up through ecosystems.  The program is suitable for students who are interested in the biological sciences, who are interested in a career in biological research, or who may be applying toward candidacy in some of the Allied Health Sciences fields. Students interested in the program are encouraged to talk to one of the advisors: Dr. Venu Cheriyath (903-468-6064), Dr. DongWon Choi (903-886-5221), Dr. Judith Ball (903-468-8153), or Dr. J.P. Slovak (903-886-5368).

II. Major in Pre-Medical Biological Sciences

The Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences offers a Pre-Medical degree in the biological sciences.  The program provides a comprehensive background in the principles and processes of biology and biological research.  This program is necessary for those students who want to enter into a medical school or a pre-professional school in the Allied Health Sciences.  Students interested in the program are encouraged to talk to one of the advisors: Dr. Venu Cheriyath (903-468-6064), Dr. J.P. Slovak (903-886-5368) or Dr.Judith Ball (903-468-8153).

IV. Major in Pre-Physical Therapy Biological Sciences

The Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences offers a Pre-Physical Therapy degree in the biological sciences.  This program is designed specifically for students who want to enter into  Physical Therapy Schools. Students interested in the program are encouraged to talk to one of the advisors: Dr. Venu Cheriyath (903-468-6064), Dr. J.P. Slovak (903-886-5468), or Dr.Judith Ball (903-468-8153).

V. Major in Environmental Sciences

This unique program is designed for students who wish to work in the growing field of environmental science.  Graduates of this program work for private environmental companies, with corporations, or with Federal, state, county, or civic governments.  Students interested in the program are encouraged to talk to the program advisor: Dr. Haydn A. ”Chip” Fox (903-886-5442), Dr. Jeff Kopachena (903-886-5305), Dr. Johanna Delgado-Acevedo (903-468-3333), or Dr. Lin Guo (903-886-5371).

VI. Major in Wildlife and Conservation Science

The Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences offers a program in Wildlife and Conservation Science.  This program is designed for students interested in Wildlife Management, Ecology, or the preservation of biodiversity.  The program is designed around the requirements established by The Wildlife Society and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  Graduates of this program are qualified to work for private, state, and Federal agencies.  In addition, students graduating from this program can proceed into a graduate program for further professional development.  Students interested in the program are encouraged to talk to the program advisor: Dr. Jeff Kopachena (903-886-5395) or Dr. Dean Ransom (903886-5938).

VII. Teacher Education Programs

Students seeking a bachelor’s degree in the teacher education program must complete:

  1. degree requirements for a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree (refer to the bachelor’s degree requirements section of this catalog),
  2. Core Curriculum Requirements (refer to that section of this catalog),
  3. requirements for admission to and retention in the Teacher Education Program (refer to the Center for Educator Certification and Academic Services section of this catalog), and
  4. professional development courses (refer to the appropriate departmental section in this catalog, i.e. Department of Curriculum and Instruction or Department Educational Leadership). 

In addition, courses in the major must be completed as shown below. “B.S. in Biological Sciences: Secondary Certification: (Grades 8 - 12) Life Sciences” For required courses see the academic advisor, Dr. J.P. Slovak (903-886-5368).

VIII. Other Programs

Students can choose from a variety of other options depending on their academic requirements.  The Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences offers the following additional programs:

Other Pre-Allied Health Programs

Second Major in Biological Sciences

Minor in Biology

Minor in Environmental Science

BSC 105 - Natural History of Texas
Hours: 4
The Natural History of Texas - (3 lecture, 2 lab) An introduction to the plants, invertebrates, and animals of Texas. Topics include the geography and climate of Texas and how these factors result in the various ecological regions of the state. In addition to describing the biodiversity of Texas, students will also be exposed to the on-going conservation and wildlife issues within the state of Texas. Laboratory exercises will involve identification and learning about local plants, invertebrates, and animals.

BSC 111 - Introduction to Biology
Hours: 1
Introduction to biological sciences and its relationship to other sciences. Explores careers and opportunities in biology and research methodology in the biological sciences. Required by anyone majoring in Biology, Environmental Science, Pre-Med and all other Pre-professional majors (excluding pre-vet) related to the life sciences.

BSC 254 - General Microbiology
Hours: 4
(BIOL 2420) General Microbiology. Four semester hours (3 lecture, 3 lab). (1) Study of microbiology emphasizing fundamental principles and applications (not interchangeable with BSC 306).

BSC 256 - Medical Terminology
Hours: 3
Medical Technology. Three semester hours. (1) This course will study the basic structure of medical words. Included will be prefixes, suffixes, roots, combining forms, and plurals. Emphasis will be placed on pronunciation and spelling. This course cannot be used or substituted for any course in any degree program in Biological Sciences.

BSC 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4

BSC 301 - Biological Literature
Hours: 3
Biological Literature and Techniques - Three semester hours This course provides students with the fundamentals of scientific thinking and scientific writing. The course starts with a brief overview of the history and philosophy of science as it pertains to biology. Students will learn about empiricism, parsimony, and how to apply the scientific method to developing and testing hypotheses. Students will be taught how to write in scientific style; naming conventions, how to cite scientific names, how to avoid obfuscatory scrivenry, establishing flow, organizing a scientific document, how to write an abstract, how to present scientific data and statistics, how to cite figures and tables, how to cite scientific sources, how to avoid plagiarism, and how to find scientific information using databases and the internet. The final part of this class deals with bioethics and the use of ethics in biological research.

BSC 303 - Cell Biology
Hours: 4
Cell Biology - Four semester hours (3 lec/ 3 lab) This course is intended for biology and pre-professional majors with a solid understanding of general biology and general chemistry. This course covers the chemical nature of the cell. It deals with the variety of chemicals found in cells as well as the subcellular structures and components. It includes an extensive review of enzymes, cell membranes and transport, cell signalling, motility of cells and within cells, and extracellular adhesion and signals. The regulation, chemical synthesis, and transport of both RNA and proteins are also covered. Prerequisites: BSc-1406 and 1407 and CHEM 1412 Note All courses carrying four semester hours have labs. Students must register for both lecture and lab sections

BSC 304 - GLB/Genetics
Hours: 4
This course is intended for biology and pre-professional majors with a solid understanding of general biology and general chemistry. Cell Biology is very helpful, and may be taken concurrently. This course covers essentially DNA, studying it at the molecular, organismal, and population levels. Students will cover the mechanisms of inheritance at the organismal level, including Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance and genetic recombination in viruses through humans. At the molecular level, topics include the structure and organization of DNA, DNA replication, techniques of DNA analysis (including recombinant DNA and DNA sequencing), and transgenic organisms. The final section of the course covers an introduction to population genetics with a thorough treatment of the Hardy-Weinberg equation and evolution. Prerequisites: BSc-101 and 102 and Chem 112; BSc-303 strongly suggested Offered: SPRING ONLY Note All courses carrying four semester hours have labs. Students must register for both lecture and lab sections.

BSC 305 - General Physiology
Hours: 4
General Physiology - Four semester hours (3 lec/3 lab) This course is designed for majors with a well-rounded background in biology. It provides students with an understanding of basic physiological principles and the functional organization of living systems. Emphasis will be placed on human physiology and the integrated functions of organ systems. Students are expected to learn the basic principles and concepts of human physiology both at the molecular and cellular levels, to learn to reason scientifically, and to understand and describe the cooperative function of multiple organ systems in the human body Pre-requisite: BSC 301 and 303. Offered: FALL ONLY Note All courses carrying four semester hours have labs. Students must register for both lecture and lab sections

BSC 306 - Applied Microbiology
Hours: 4
Applied Microbiology. Four semester hours (3 lecture, 3 lab). (2) Comprehensive course in microbiology emphasizing modern applications.

BSC 307 - Ecology
Hours: 3
Ecology is the study of living things and their interaction with their environment. This class takes a hierarchical look at ecological processes from ecosystems to populations. Specific topics include the flow of energy and matter through global and local ecosystems, factors affecting production and biodiversity, zones of tolerance, ecological succession, ecotones and ecoclines, community ecology, niche theory, population models, and evolutionary arms races. Prerequisite:BSC 1407 or BSC 1413. BSC 301 or ENVS 303.

BSC 310 - Animal Behavior
Hours: 3
An introduction to the principles of animal behavior with an emphasis on Methods of Observation and the proximate and ultimate causes of behavior. Aspects of physiology and development of behavior, instinct and learning and modern cognitive ethology will be addressed. Prerequisite: BSC 1407 or BSC 1413, and BSC 301.

BSC 314 - Comparative Vertebrate Physiology
Hours: 3
The course is a comparative study of basic physiological principles and functional organization with emphasis on the functioning of organ systems in various vertebrate classes and their adaptation to the environment leading to an understanding of evolutionary relationships. The course evaluates i) the mechanisms by which animals perform their life-sustaining functions, ii) the ways in which diverse phylogenetic groups of animals both resemble each other and differ, iii) the ways in which physiology and ecology interact, and iv) the importance of all levels of organization, from genes to proteins and tissues to organs, for the full understanding of physiological systems.

BSC 335 - Wildlife Management I
Hours: 3
Wildlife Management I. Three semester hours. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the many aspects of wildlife and conservation science. It will provide an introduction to the history of wildlife management and conservation, ecosystems and ecology, population modeling, animal behavior, food and cover, wildlife diseases, predators and predation, and hunting and trapping. Offered: FALL

BSC 336 - Wildlife Management II
Hours: 3
Wildlife Management II. Three semester hours. This course is designed to complement Wildlife Management I and provides an introduction to the many aspects of wildlife ecology and conservation science. Topics covered include water and soils, farmlands, rangelands, and forests, parks and refuges, urban wildlife management, and non-game and endangered species. Students are required to participate in field trips designed to give practical experience in wildlife management techniques. Offered: SPRING

BSC 337 - Field Methods in Wildlife and Conservation Science
Hours: 4
This course provides students with practical training in the methods used to collect quantitative data on plant and animal populations, animal movements and home ranges, habitat associations, and animal behavior. Field exercises are integrated with lecture material emphasizing study design, statistics, and data interpretation. Prerequisites: PSY 302.

BSC 338 - Wildlife Management Techniques
Hours: 3
This class will develop the principles and techniques for managing wildlife populations. Topics covered will include experimental design, hypothesis testing, scientific writing, techniques for capturing and marking wildlife, age and sex determination, parameter estimation (population size, density, survival, etc.), radio-telemetry, home range and resource selection. Students enrolled in this course must be willing to participate in a field-based classroom research project when and where feasible.

BSC 397 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4

BSC 401 - Senior Seminar
Hours: 1
Senior Seminar. One semester hour. Discussions and presentations of issues of current interest in the biological sciences and of related career opportunities. Prerequisites: BSC 304, 305, 306, 307, concurrent enrollment in one or more of these classes or permission of instructor. When Offered (Spring)

BSC 402 - Ornithology
Hours: 3
Ornithology. Three semester hours. This course begins with an overview of current theories regarding the origins of birds and flight. This is followed by a brief survey the living orders and their biogeography. Other topics include the mechanics and adaptations for flight, avian physiology and anatomy, migration, communication and behavior, ecology, and avian conservation. Pre-requisite BSC 301. Offered SPRING, EVEN YEARS

BSC 404 - Vertebrate Biology
Hours: 3
Vertebrate Biology. Three semester hours. This course takes a systematic approach to understanding vertebrate evolution, diversity and biology. It will follow the development of each vertebrate taxon through the fossil record from late Cambrian to the present. This is followed by discussions of vertebrate zoogeography, habitat and foraging, feeding modes, dispersal and migration, mating systems and parental care. Pre-requisite BSC 301. Offered: SPRING, ODD YEARS

BSC 405 - Wildlife Internship
Hours: 1-6
This course, intended for Wildlife and Conservation Science Majors, provides the opportunity for students to gain hands-on experience in preparation for careers in wildlife management and wildlife or ecological research. Assignments will be at an approved work situation under supervision of a designated faculty member. Students who are majoring in the Wildlife and Conservation Science program are required to take 5 semester hours of BSC 405. Every 40 hours of hands-on experience at an approved internship qualified for 1sh of credit. Therefore, 200 hours of hands-on experience is required to make up the 6 semester hours required in the program.

BSC 406 - Mammalogy
Hours: 3
Mammalogy - Three semester hours The objective of this course is to survey the phylogenetic relationships, diversity, biology, and ecology of mammals, including an understanding of the characterization of the orders and families of the extant mammals based on morphological traits, evolutionary

BSC 410 - Behavioral Ecology
Hours: 3
Behavioral Ecology - Three semester hours This course examines the adaptive and evolutionary basis of animal behavior. It begins with an economic approach to behavior: optimality models and evolutionary stable strategies. This is followed by looking at predator-prey strategies, behavioral adaptations for competition, social behavior, aggression and fighting, sexual conflict and sexual selection, parental care and mating systems, alternate reproductive strategies, and altruism. Pre-requisite 301.

BSC 412 - Quantitative Biology
Hours: 3
Quantitative Biology. Three semester hours. The objective of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and understanding of the methods of statistical analysis applicable to biological research. Emphasis will be placed on the concepts and application of statistical thinking. Basic probability theory, parametric and non-parametric statistics including t-tests, analysis of variance, correlation, regression, and other quantitative methods will be introduced. Prerequisite: MATH 1314.

BSC 414 - Evolutionary Biology
Hours: 3
Evolutionary Biology. Three semester hours. In-depth view of evolutionary theory including gene flow, genetic drift, mutation, molecular evolution, mechanisms of speciation, phylogenies, and the evolution of sex, and sexual selection. Pre-requisite: BSC 301.

BSC 416 - Wildlife Population Biology
Hours: 3
This course outlines processes governing the abundance and distribution of animals and plants, and the consequences for natural resource management. Practical applications lie in wildlife management, sustainable harvesting of resources, pest control and conservation of endangered species. Topics will include mathematical models of population growth, population viability analysis, and metapopulations, dispersal, population harvesting, predation, population cycles, and competition. Prerequisites: MATH 142.

BSC 417 - GEOSPATIAL MAPPING
Hours: 3
Geospatial Mapping. Three semester hours. (3 lecture, 0 lab) The course will provide basic knowledge of the fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), including GIS theory and applications. The course will take a hands-on and problem solving approach to learning GIS and will cover basic GIS including map characteristics and projections, spatial data models, relational databases, and spatial analysis with a focus on natural resource research and management and environmental science. Prerequisite: BSC 1407 or BSC 1413.

BSC 419 - Gene Regulation
Hours: 3
This course will provide a rigorous knowledge in regulation of gene expression so that students will be ready for graduate level courses. Although this course will introduce students to prokaryotic gene transcription and gene regulation, the emphasis will be on the molecular biology of gene expression in eukaryotes. This course will familiarize the student with current technology and driving principles of the field of gene regulation.

BSC 420 - Immunology
Hours: 3
Immunology. Three semester hours. This course is designed for majors with a well-rounded background in biology. Therefore, this course provides students with an understanding of basic immunological principles and the functional organization of living systems. Emphasis will be placed on human physiology and the cooperative interplay between innate and acquired immunity. Students are expected to learn the basic principles and concepts of immunology both at the molecular and cellular levels, to learn to reason scientifically, and to understand and describe the function of immune systems in the human body. Prerequisites: BSC 301 and 305.

BSC 421 - Reproductive Physiology
Hours: 3
Reproductive Physiology. Three semester hours. A study of the development and function of the male and female reproductive systems of humans. Prerequisites: BSC 301 and 305.

BSC 422 - Comp Vertebrate Anatomy
Hours: 0-4
Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. Four semester hours. (3 lecture, 4 lab) The lecture material in this course explore the evolution of vertebrate structure and design among vertebrate taxa. Emphasis is placed on the integument, skeletal, muscular, digestive, urogenital, respiratory, circulatory and nervous systems. Laboratory dissections, using the dogfish and the cat as models, are used to complement the lecture material.

BSC 423 - Endocrinology
Hours: 3
Endocrinology. Three semester hours. This course is designed for undergraduate students with a solid background in biology and cell biology. Therefore, this course provides students with a greater understanding of molecular, developmental, and network mechanisms of endocrine function. After a basic introduction of endocrinology and basic mechanisms, emphasis and focus will be placed on individual tissues and their respective hormones including the pituitary, hypothalamus, neurohypophysial, gastrointestinal, pancreatic, adrenal, thyroid and reproductive systems. Students are expected to gain an in-depth understanding of basic principles and concepts of hormones, their various activities and ultimate outcomes including feedback systems. In addition students will continue to learn to reason scientifically, and understand and describe the cooperative function of tissues in this universal system. Prerequisites: BSC 301 and 305.

BSC 424 - Toxicology
Hours: 3
Toxicology. Three semester hours. An overview of the basic science of poisons, including the disposition of chemicals in the body, the role of metabolism in enhancing or reducing their toxicity, mechanisms of toxicity and the effects of toxicants on major organ systems. Prerequisites: BSC 301, 305 and Chem 211.

BSC 425 - Fundamentals of Neuroscience
Hours: 3
Fundamentals of Neuroscience. Three semester hours. This course is intended for advanced undergraduate biology students who understand genetics and cell biology/biochemistry. The course is a survey introducing various aspects of neuroscience and is textbook based. The cell types of the nervous system are introduced, with emphasis on the molecular specializations used for these cells to function and develop connections to other cells. The structure, function, and processing of all 6 senses (including kinesthesia) are covered, as are muscle control circuits. More complex functions of the nervous system, including control of eye movements, hunger, sleep, addiction, speech, and learning and memory are also covered. Prerequisite: BSC 301 and 304.

BSC 426 - Histology
Hours: 4
This four hour course examines basic human histology from the cellular level to the organ system level using prepared slides, texts, videos and other media. In this way students learn the relationship between cell structure and cell function, how tissue types differentiate and how organ architecture facilitates its function. Students in this class will learn normal histology as a prerequisite for understanding pathology. The emphasis is on classical histology of normal human tissues rather than diseased tissues, though some pathologies will be examined by comparison to normal tissues. Students will learn technical skills concerning microscopy and slide preparation. All students must enroll in both the laboratory and lecture sections.

BSC 427 - Pharmacology
Hours: 3
Pharmacology This course is designed for undergraduate students with a background in biology, cell biology and chemistry. Therefore, this course provides students with a greater understanding of general concepts of pharmacology. Next, specific drugs and sites of drug action are further examined beginning with the peripheral, followed by the central nervous system. We then will focus on the pharmacology of the heart, the vascular and renal systems, followed by pharmacology of the respiratory system, then endocrine system and drugs affecting the immune system. Finally we examine the pharmacology of infectious disease. Pre-requisites: BSC 303/CHEM 1411

BSC 428 - Introductory Medical Microbiology
Hours: 3
Introductory Medical Microbiology. Three Semester Hours. This is a course for junior or senior biology undergraduate students designed to help understand the basic principles of pathogenic microorganisms, infection, and human-pathogen interactions. Specific topics covered during this class include pathogenic microorganisms, diagnostic laboratory procedures, infection controls, and emerging diseases. This course includes many etiological agents responsible for infectious diseases and will focus on the principles of pathogenic mechanisms, rather than individual cases of diseases, in order to foster a student’s ability to develop the fundamental understanding required for their future clinical career.

BSC 430 - Introductory Virology
Hours: 3
Introductory Virology (Three Hours). This course is designed to introduce the significance of viruses to biology, the origin of life, and our current world. Viruses are the most numerous and the most ubiquitous form of life, although whether viruses are life or not is still an open debate. They are virtually everywhere and they are in tight relationship with other forms of life on earth. This course will focus on the principle nature of viral life; obligate parasite and host dependency. Topics include introduction to viruses, host specificity, viral replication cycles, virus classification & nomenclature, viral diseases, how viruses interact with host body, and host resistance to viruses. Prerequisites: BSC 301 and 306.

BSC 431 - Eukaryotic Cell Biology
Hours: 3
This course is the study of advanced knowledge of the eukaryotic cell including contemporary concepts of membranes, signal transduction mechanisms, messengers and receptors, extracellular structures, cell adhesions and attachment proteins, cell cycle and regulation, protein synthesis, sorting and targeting, cytoskelton and cell movements. Prerequisites: BSC 303 Cell Biology or concurrent enrollment.

BSC 435 - Wildlife Habitat Ecology and Management
Hours: 3
This class will expose the student to the history and concepts of an animal’s habitat beginning with the ideas of Aldo Leopold to current ideas of what habitat is. Students will be introduced to principles and techniques of habitat management as they apply to forest, rangeland, wetland, and agricultural ecosystems. Current concepts of Conservation Biology such as fragmentation, meta-population ecology, and corridor ecology will also be covered. Students enrolled in this course must be willing to attend field trips when and where feasible to see actual management practices conducted in the field.

BSC 436 - Plant Diversity & Conservation
Hours: 3
Plant Diversity and Conservation. Three semester hours. The course focuses on patterns and distribution of plant diversity and threats to plant diversity. Range of strategies and approaches used in plant conservation will be discussed.

BSC 437 - Ecological Restoration
Hours: 3
Ecological Restoration of Plant Communities - Three semester hours The class is an introduction to landscape scale, process-oriented approaches to ecological restoration. Topics include enhancing resource capture, techniques in re-vegetation and restoration of historic vegetation. Prescribed fire and grazing as restoration and management techniques will also be addressed.

BSC 438 - Wetland Ecology and Management
Hours: 4
This class will address the ecology of wetlands from a systems approach, starting first with what defines a wetland both legally and functionally, and covering important and defining principles of hydro-period, soils, wetland plants, wetland succession, delineation, and wetlands as wildlife habitat. The lab will immerse students in field exercises ranging from wetland plant collection and identification, and wetland bird identification. Students enrolled in this course must be willing to attend field trips when and where feasible to see different wetland types and the function and values they provide.

BSC 461 - Biology for Mid School Teacher
Hours: 3
Biology for Middle School Teachers. Three semester hours. (2) This course will examine the necessary content for students wishing to teach at the fourth through eighth grade level. This course will combine both content and pedagogy. Emphasis will be placed on the content as expressed the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills. This course cannot be used for advanced credit for a biology major or minor. Prerequisites: MATH 1314 and 8 sh of biological science or consent of instructor.

BSC 489 - INDEPENDENT STUDY
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a consenting faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

BSC 490 - H Honors Thesis
Hours: 3
Honors Thesis.

BSC 491 - H Ind Honors Readings
Hours: 0-4
Individual Honors Reading.

BSC 492 - Developmental Biology
Hours: 3
This course is designed to explore the fundamental concepts and mechanisms that regulate the wonder of animal development from fertilization of the egg to formation of the adult organism, including such topics as cycle of life, differential gene expression, cell-cell communication, fertilization, early development, formation of germ layers (ectoderm, mesoderm, endoderm) and their derivatives, inductive cell/tissue interactions, stem cells, organogenesis, environment/genetics/birth defects, evolutionary changes and more.

BSC 493 - Pathophysiology
Hours: 3
Pathophysiological changes underlie most of the diseases affecting humans. This course is designed to provide basic understanding on the pathologic alterations in physiology at the cellular, tissue and organ level and how such alterations could lead to diseases across the human life span. Following an initial introduction to altered cellular and tissue biology, pathophysiology of major organs and systems will be covered in separate modules. In addition, pediatric pathophysiology and aging related changes are also included in the content. Prerequisites: BSC 305 and BSC 303.

BSC 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

BSC 498 - Parasitology
Hours: 1-4
In this class students will study parasites, their hosts, and the relationship between them.

BSC 1309 - US - Human Biology: Structure and Function
Hours: 3
US - Human Biology: Structure and Function. Three semester hours. This (University Studies) course is designed to apply the principles of biology to man as a functional unit of our social organization.

BSC 1406 - US-Introductory Biology I
Hours: 4
BSC 1406 (BSC 101) - Introductory Biology I - Four semester hours (3 lec / 3 lab) This course is the first half of the Introductory Biology series. It is designed for the following majors: Broadfield Biology, Pre-Med, Pre-Allied Health, and Pre-Vet. Topics covered include biological evolution, biochemistry, cellular and molecular biology, genetics, and microbiology. Note All courses carrying four semester hours have labs. Students must register for both lecture and lab sections

BSC 1407 - US: Introductory Biology II
Hours: 4
BSC 1407 (BSC 102) - US: Zoology - Four semester hours (3 lec/ 3 lab) This course is designed for students in Agricultural Science, Plant and Soil Science, Animal Science, Wildlife and Conservation Science, and in Environmental Science. Students are introduced to animal cellular biology and physiology, animal diversity and classification, and the biogeography and ecology of animal populations. Topics covered include cellular metabolism, animal physiology and genetics, developmental biology and architectural patterns, evolution, and the diversity of animal life. Pre-requisites: a grade of C or better in BSC 101 or 1406.

BSC 1409 - US-Hum Bio: Struct/Funct
Hours: 4
(BIOL 1409) Human Biology: Structure and Function. Four semester hours (3 lecture, 3 lab). This (University Studies) course is designed to apply the principles of biology to man as a functional unit of our social organization.

BSC 1411 - US- Botany
Hours: 4
BSC 1411 (BSC 131) - US: Botany - Four semester hours (3 lec/ 2 lab) This course is designed for students majoring in Agricultural Science, Plant and Soil Science, Wildlife and Conservation Science, and in Environmental Science. Students are introduced to the structure and function of plants as well as their diversity and ecology. Topics covered include plant cellular and gross anatomy, plant physiology and biochemistry, genetics, evolution, classification, and biogeography.

BSC 1413 - US-Zoology
Hours: 4
BSC 1413 (BSC 132) - Zoology - Four semester hours 3/Lec, 2/Lab This course is designed for students in Agricultural Science, Plant and Soil Science, Animal Science, Wildlife and Conservation Science, and in Environmental Science. Students are introduced to animal cellular biology and physiology, animal diversity and classification, and the biogeography and ecology of animal populations. Topics covered include cellular metabolism, animal physiology and genetics, developmental biology and architectural patterns, evolution, and the diversity of animal life.

BSC 2401 - US-Hum Anatomy/Physiology I
Hours: 0-4
(BIOL 2401) Human Anatomy and Physiology. Four semester hours (3 lecture, 3 lab). (1) Study of the structure and functions of human organ systems.

BSC 2402 - US-Hum Anatmy/Physiology II
Hours: 4
(BIOL 2402) Human Anatomy and Physiology II. Four semester hours (3 lecture, 3 lab). (2) Study of the structure and function of human organ systems (continuation of BSc 251). Pre-requisite: BSC 2401

ENVS 103 - Natural Disasters
Hours: 3
Scientific principles and case studies of natural disasters, including those related to geological, meteorological, biological, cosmological, and man-made hazards and disasters. Note, this is a university studies course.

ENVS 104 - GLB/US-Natural Disasters for Environmental Science Majors
Hours: 4
Scientific principles and case studies of natural disasters, including those related to geological, meteorological, biological, cosmological, and man-made hazards and disasters.

ENVS 301 - Risk Assessment
Hours: 3
Risk Assessment - Three semester hours This course is designed to provide an overview of ecological/environmental risk assessments. Students are involved in group projects to produce an ERA based on an existing abandoned hazardous waste site on EPA’s National Priorities List. Students also complete a project to develop an Environmental Impact Statement based on a hypothetical government agency project proposal. Prerequisites: None

ENVS 302 - Phase I Environmental Site Assessments
Hours: 3
Project-based course on protocol and methods for conducting Phase I Environmental Site Assessments as mandated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Phase I Environmental Site Assessments are a common type of investigation conducted by environmental professionals within environmental consulting firms.

ENVS 303 - Research Methods in Environmental Sciences
Hours: 4
This course is intended to provide an introduction to a wide range of methods for conducting research in the environmental field for students. Students will learn how to create the research question, search the literature, develop the methods, collect and analyze data, draw conclusions, publish and present the results. It will also include the techniques of scientific writing and reviewing, grant writing and oral presentations.

ENVS 305 - Environmental Hydrology
Hours: 3
An overview of all aspects of the field of hydrology, including the hydrologic cycle, surface water, and groundwater. The bulk of the course concerns groundwater and focuses on practical methods for ascertaining aquifer characteristics necessary to evaluating groundwater supplies and groundwater contamination problems and remediation. Prerequisites: (ESCI 101 with a minimum grade of C or ESCI 1403 with a minimum grade of C) and (MATH 141 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 1314 with a minimum grade of C). Note All courses carrying four semester hours have labs. Students must register for both lecture and lab sections When Offered (Spring).

ENVS 306 - Environmental Geography
Hours: 3
This course will help students to analyze the geographic dimensions (e.g., scale, connectivity across space) of the activities of agencies or individuals working on solutions to environmental problems in a particular location. It will give students a globalized perspective for environmental sciences that will help them in the world outside the university scenario. It will also emphasize the importance of critical thinking and perspectives when taking environmental sciences decisions.

ENVS 312 - Introduction to Environmental Toxicology
Hours: 3
This course is designed to provide an overview of environmental toxicology, including an examination of the major classes of pollutants, their fate in the environment, their disposition in organisms, and their mechanisms of toxicity. An emphasis will also be placed on assessing the toxicity of pollutants in biological and environmental systems.

ENVS 402 - Air Pollution Control
Hours: 3
This course will introduce the sources of air pollution; analyze its effects on human and other organisms; study of federal, state, and local regulatory requirements; analyze mechanisms and methods for air pollution control and management.

ENVS 403 - Environmental Ethics and Law
Hours: 3
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the numerous ethical issues and perspectives confronting society and environmental scientists. The course also provides an overview of environmental laws on regulations and practice in navigating through these laws.

ENVS 404 - Principles of Sustainability
Hours: 3
This course will prepare students to expand sustainable literacy, analyze the interconnections among the physical and biological sciences and environmental systems, summarize the effects of sustainability on health and well-being, analyze connections among social, economic, and environmental systems, employ energy conservation strategies to reduce the use of fossil fuels, investigate alternative energy options, analyze approaches used by your community to promote and implement sustainability.

ENVS 405 - Internship in Environmental Science
Hours: 3
This course offers an opportunity for students to gain hands-on experience in the fields of environmental research, education, and sciences. This program enables students to work on specific projects under the direction of professional staff and is tailored to provide the maximum educational benefit to each participant. Students will be able to chose among private, government, and non-governmental organizations (NGO's) that have established collaboration with the Department of Environmental Sciences at Texas A&M University - Commerce.

ENVS 489 - Independent Studies
Hours: 1-4

ENVS 490 - H Honors Thesis
Hours: 3

ENVS 491 - H Ind Honors Readings
Hours: 3

ENVS 497 - Special Topic
Hours: 0-4
Special Topics - 0 - 4 semester hours may vary

ENVS 1301 - Introduction to Environmental Science
Hours: 3
(ENVR 1301) course designed to cover major areas relating to contemporary ecological/environmental problems and to introduce the student to the multiple roles of the environmental professional in addressing these problems.

ENVS 1401 - Introduction to Environmental Science for Environmental Science Majors
Hours: 4
Introduction to Environmental Science for Environmental Science Majors. Four semester hours (3 lec/2 lab). Survey course designed to cover major areas relating to contemporary ecological/environmental problems and to introduce the student to the multiple roles of the environmental professional in addressing these problems. Note, this is a university studies course.

Judith Ball
Professor & Department Head
B.S., Southeastern Louisiana University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University

Venugopalan Cheriyath
Professor
BS., Kerala Agricultural University, India, MS., Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India, Ph.D., Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India, Postdoctoral Fellow Research Associate, Tufts University School of Medicine

DongWon Choi
Associate Professor
B.E., Taegu University; M.S., Ball State University; Ph.D., Iowa State University

Johanna Delgado-Acevedo
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., University of Puerto Rico; Ph.D. Texas A & M University - Kingsville

Haydn A. Fox
Assistant Professor and Associate Dean of Science and Engineering
B.A., Ambassador College; B.S., M.S., Southeast Missouri State University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina.

Lin Guo
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., Nanchang University; Ph.D., The University of Akron

Izhar Khan
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., Aligarh Muslim University; Ph.D., Banaras Hindu University

Jeffrey G. Kopachena
Professor
B.S., M.S., University of Manitoba; Ph.D., University of Toronto.

Lani Lyman-Henley
Assistant Professional Track Faculty
B.A., University of California; M.S., Ph.D., University of Tennessee.

Kodeeswaran Parameshwaran
Assistant Professor
B.S., University of Jaffna, M. Phil., University Peradeniya; Ph.D., Auburn University

Dean Ransom
Assistant Professor
B.S., Texas A&M University; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Texas A&M University

John Paul Slovak
Assistant Professional Track Faculty
B.S., M.S., Ed.D., East Texas State University.