Agricultural Sciences

Randy M Harp (Director)
Location: Ag/IT, 903-886-5358
Agricultural Sciences Web Site: http://www.tamuc.edu/academics/colleges/scienceEngineeringAgriculture/departments/agriculturalSciences/default.aspx

Program of Graduate Work

Master of Science in Agricultural Sciences

The School of Agriculture offers a Master of Science degree program in which students may choose to emphasize course work in agricultural economics, agricultural and family education, agricultural mechanization, animal science, plant and soil science, or horticulture. Graduate-level research is encouraged through the use of on campus laboratories and facilities, the University Instructional and Research Farm, and the Plant Science Research Farm.

The School of Agriculture also coordinates the Transition to Teaching program for degreed professionals who wish to become certified to teach Agricultural Science and Technology or Family and Consumer Sciences in secondary schools. This program consists of graduate-level courses in agricultural and family education that focus on professional development competencies required for a successful career in teaching, as well as preparation for the Texas Examination of Educator Standards (TExES). Courses may be applied to a Master of Science degree in Agricultural Sciences, provided the student is admitted to a degree program. Individuals interested in Transition to Teaching should contact the department for specific information regarding admission.

The department additionally has signed agreements with other cooperating institutions to conduct research projects at off-campus locations.

Admission

Admission to a graduate program is granted by the Dean of Graduate Studies upon the recommendation of the department. Applicants must meet the following requirements for admission in addition to meeting the general university requirements in Agricultural Science.

Degree Requirements

Students may choose either the Option I (thesis) or Option II (non-thesis) program. Though not guaranteed assistantships are awarded preferentially to students who are conducting thesis.

Note: The School reserves the right to suspend from the program any student who in the judgment of the departmental graduate committee, does not meet the professional expectations of the field.

AEC 520 - AgriBusiness Analysis and Forecasting
Hours: 3
Fundamentals of linear programming, forecasting, and simulation based on economic theories using statistical software packages. Construction, solution, and interpretation of different types of linear programming models. Quantitative techniques for forecasting economic data. Risk analysis and decision-making using simulation.

AEC 530 - Agricultural Production Economics
Hours: 3
Agricultural production theory for optimization of resources under certainty and uncertainty. Economic theory, analytical methodology, and agribusiness firm behavior.

AEC 540 - Advanced Theory of Demand and Price Analysis
Hours: 3
The development and use of economic models for price analysis and forecasting with emphasis on the interpretation of economic relationship in agriculture. Analysis of the effects of consumer behavior upon marketing firms and upon the demand for agricultural products.

AEC 550 - Market Organization and Structure
Hours: 3
Analysis of the conduct and performance of agricultural firms under imperfect market conditions. Sources of imperfections, managerial strategies, and welfare considerations under imperfect market conditions.

AEC 560 - International Agricultural Trade
Hours: 3
Trade theory dealing with the production, marketing, and distribution of goods and services. Comparative advantage, gains from specialization, trade models, trade policy analysis, partial equilibrium analysis of free trade, welfare aspects of trade, preferential agreements, and policy issues.

AEC 589 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

AEC 597 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

AFE 518 - Thesis
Hours: 3-6
Thesis, Six semester hours. Development and reporting of a research project under the supervision of a graduate faculty member. Note: Granting of credit for this course is dependent upon completion and approval of a thesis.

AFE 570 - Instructional Management
Hours: 3
Instructional Management. Three semester hours. Provides students with a review of the ethical and pedagogical principles and practices needed to organize and deliver instructional programs in Agricultural Sciences and Family and Consumer Sciences.

AFE 571 - Program Development
Hours: 3
Program Development. Three semester hours. This course addresses the theoretical and practical principles of planning, funding, and conducting effective educational programs in Agricultural Sciences and Family and Consumer Sciences.

AFE 572 - Special Populations
Hours: 3
Special Populations. Three semester hours. Principles, procedures, and policies associated with teaching students who are representative of special populations as defined by federal career-technical education guidelines.

AFE 573 - Practicum in Teaching
Hours: 3
Practicum in Teaching. Three semester hours. Supervised teaching practicum in Agricultural Science or Family and Consumer Sciences at the secondary level. Course includes field-based teaching component and monthly seminars on strategies and issues related to the teaching profession.

AFE 574 - Assessment & Evaluation
Hours: 3
Assessment and Evaluation. Three semester hours. Theories and techniques used in assessing student learning and skill development and evaluating educational programs in Agricultural Science and Family and Consumer Sciences.

AFE 575 - Community Leadership & Development
Hours: 3
Theories and practices associated with organizing and implementing social and economic change within the community context. Prerequisites: None.

AFE 576 - Models Experiential Learning
Hours: 3
Application of experiential learning theories and techniques to instructional programs in secondary, postsecondary, and community-based settings. Prerequisites: Admission to graduate school.

AFE 577 - Coordinating Extension Program
Hours: 3
Techniques and practical field experience in organizing, delivering, and evaluating community-based programs through the cooperative extension model. Prerequisites: Admission to graduate school.

AFE 579 - Field Experience in Teaching
Hours: 3
Fifteen week supervised teaching internship in agriculture or family and consumer sciences at the secondary or postsecondary level.

AFE 589 - INDEPENDENT STUDY
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

AFE 595 - Res Lit Tech
Hours: 3
Research Literature and Techniques. Three semester hours. This course provides a review of significant research studies produced by investigators in the student's major field with emphasis on the investigative and verification techniques that were used.

AFE 597 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class addressing topics relevant to teaching Agricultural Science. May be repeated when topics vary.

AG 503 - Adult Education
Hours: 3
Adult Education - Three semester hours The purpose of this course is to advance the understanding of the basic principles behind motivating adults to learn. Procedures in implementing these principles to bring about change in adult behavior will be explored.

AG 504 - Qualitative Research
Hours: 3
Qualitative Research - Three semester hours This course investigates the different strategies/methods of conducting qualitative research such as conducting effective interviews, participant observation, and document analysis (data mining). Students will learn about the different research designs associated with qualitative research and explore data analysis and establishing validity/reliability 
for qualitative research.

AG 505 - Statistical Methods in Agriculture
Hours: 3
Introductory statistics course for graduate students in agricultural sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, measures of dispersion, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, analysis of variance, pairwise comparisons, and linear regression. Prerequisites: Admission to graduate school.

AG 506 - Advanced Statistical Methods in Agriculture
Hours: 3
Advanced statistics course for students pursuing the Master of Science in Agricultural Sciences with a thesis option. Includes Chi-square, t-distribution, normal distribution, repeated measures, advanced regression analysis and non-parametric statistics. Prerequisites: AG 505.

AG 507 - Water Issues and Ethics
Hours: 3
This course will explore critical issues and ethical considerations related to existing and proposed water management policies and conservation promotion. Perspectives from rural and urban consumers, agricultural producers, and industry will be examined in context to these issues at the local, state, national, and global levels. Prerequisites: Admission to graduate school.

AG 508 - Gardening Across the Curriculum
Hours: 3
This course provides a review of research and resources related to school and university-based gardening programs for academic enrichment, nature awareness, nutrition improvement, and other aspects of garden-based learning. Prerequisites: Admission to graduate school.

AG 512 - Methods of Technol Change
Hours: 3
Methods of Technological Change - Three semester hours This course will focus on the processes by which professional change agents (for example, extension agents) influence the introduction, adoption, and diffusion of technological change. The interlocking relationships of technology, culture, and society and the role of the change agent in affecting those relationships will be covered. Students will learn how to predict and minimize the undesirable consequences of change and how to enhance the development of communication skills required when working with people.

AG 518 - Thesis
Hours: 3-6
Thesis. Three to six semester hours. Development of a research project under the supervision of a staff member. Granting of credit for this project is dependent upon the completion and approval of the thesis.

AG 532 - Sci Meth Ag Research
Hours: 3
Scientific Methodology in Agricultural Research. 3 Semester Hours. The course is for graduate students in an option 1 (thesis) graduate program and introduces students to the processes of scientific investigation, research methodologies and techniques, data interpretation, experimental design options, and scientific methodologies involved with planning, executing, interpreting and the scientific writing of research projects.

AG 589 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study - Hours: One to four Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisites Consent of department head. Note May be repeated when the topic varies.

AG 595 - Research Lit Techniques
Hours: 3
Research Literature and Techniques. Three semester hours. A careful study of the latest research literature and techniques available in different fields of agriculture. A research paper will be required according to the interests of the individual student.

AG 597 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-5
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

AG 597W - Special Topics
Hours: 1-5
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

AG 599 - Grad Seminar in the Ag Science
Hours: 1
AG 599 - Seminar - Hours: One Topics on the latest research and techniques in the agricultural sciences. Note Must be taken two times for credit.

AGED 597 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

AMC 589 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

AMC 597 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

ANS 510 - Adv Ultrasound Tech
Hours: 3
Advanced Ultrasound Techniques for Body Composition in Livestock - Three semester hours - Cross listed with: ANS 410 This course is designed to provide students with basic knowledge and techniques of real-time ultrasound to measure body composition in Livestock. Students will compose and present a research paper to class members and Professor.

ANS 511 - Adv Reproductive Physi
Hours: 3
Advanced Reproductive Physiology. Three semester hours. Recent advances in mammalian reproductive physiology. Special emphasis on endocrine chemistry and cellular action. Prerequisite: ANS 311.

ANS 512 - Endocrinology of Domestic Animals
Hours: 3
Study of the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine system, hormone-producing cells, synthesis of hormones, mechanisms of hormone action, and effects of hormones on physiological processes in domestic animals. Study of hormone-related diseases and disorders.

ANS 513 - Environmental Physiology of Domestic Animals
Hours: 3
Principles of environmental physiology and animal adaptation with emphasis on mechanisms of temperature regulation and related nutritional and metabolic-hormonal functions.

ANS 515 - Advanced Animal Nutrition
Hours: 3
Principles of animal nutrition; anatomy and physiology of the digestive system; biochemistry of digestion, absorption, and metabolism; and animal nutrition research methodology with emphasis on domestic animal species.

ANS 522 - Animal Breeding
Hours: 3
Animal Breeding. Three semester hours. An advanced course dealing with problems in population genetics as applied to domestic animals. Heredity and environmental interaction, methods of selection, mating systems, and biometrics of animal improvements. Prerequisite: ANS 310.

ANS 535 - Adv Principles of Livestock Mg
Hours: 3
Advanced Principles of Livestock Management. Three semester hours. Course presents the latest technologies in animal management of various livestock species. Topics include nutrition, reproductive physiology, waste management for protecting the environment and ground water reserves, along with integrated management practices for complimentary animal species.

ANS 589 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

ANS 597 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

EQSC 589 - Independent Study
Hours: 0-4

EQSC 597 - SPECIAL TOPICS
Hours: 1-4

FDSC 510 - Grape & Wine Chemistry
Hours: 4
Grape and Wine Chemistry - Four semester hours Mechanistic basis for the chemistry and biochemistry of vines, grapes, yeast, and bacteria used in winemaking, wine spoilage, and health issues of alcohol and wine. Critical evaluation of the literature pertaining to the above subjects.

FDSC 511 - Food in Social Context
Hours: 3
This course will examine cultural, sociological, economic, geographic, and political factors affecting food production, processing, distribution, and consumption. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

FDSC 519 - Natural Products of Wine
Hours: 4
Natural Products of Wine - Four semester hours Structure, occurrence, and changes due to wine production to the natural products found in wine. Chemicals with a sensory impact will be emphasized, including flavonoids and other phenolics, terpenes and norisoprenoids, pyrazines, oak volatiles and other wine constituents.

FDSC 523 - Inst. Anal. Must & Wine
Hours: 4
Instrumental Analysis of Must and Wine - Four semester hours Theory and practice of instrumental analysis of wines and musts. Emphasis on the principles of analytical techniques (e.g., EC, GC, HPLC, Mass Spectrometry) and key factors determining correct choice of instrumental method.

FDSC 525 - Adv. Wine Microbiology
Hours: 4
Advanced Wine Microbiology - Four semester hours Identification, physiology, and biochemistry of bacteria and yeasts involved in wine making and spoilage of wines. Vinous and malolactic fermentations. Sherry organisms and other film yeasts.

FDSC 535 - Winery Mgmt
Hours: 4
Winery Management - Four semester hours Physical properties of a winery; administrative organizational set-up; personnel; purchasing, packaging and shipping; local, state, and federal regulatory statutes.

FDSC 563 - Grape Development
Hours: 4
Grape Development and Composition - Four semester hours The anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry of grape development, with emphasis on the development of grape composition relevant to winemaking.

FDSC 589 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study - 1 to 4 semester hours Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies

FDSC 597 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

PLS 500 - Soil Fertility
Hours: 3
Soil Fertility. Three semester hours. The essential elements in the soil will be discussed, and soil samples will be analyzed to determine the level of elements that are contained. Prerequisites: PLS 309, 320 and CHEM 111, 112, 211.

PLS 501 - Ag & Bio & Instrumentation
Hours: 3
Agricultural and Biological Instrumentation. Three semester hours. (2 lecture, 2 lab) Principles, equipment, and techniques for measuring variables in plant, soil, and environmental sciences. Spectrophotometry, chromatography, atomic absorption, weather sensors and data loggers, and tissue culture are covered.

PLS 502 - Adv Crop Physiology
Hours: 3
Advanced Crop Physiology - Three semester hours The undergraduate class PLS 381 (a prelude to this proposed class) covers physiological processes underlying crop growth and development and the effect of crop management practices on physiology. This PLS 502 Advanced Crop Physiol class will briefly cover those principles in PLS 381 but will also cover the following: crop physiological responses to water (and other abiotic) stresses, the details of yield components and how they compensate for each other, nitrogen metabolism as it relates to grain growth and quality, fertility effects on forage yield and quality. Laboratory exercises will be designed to elucidate these principles. Pre-requisites: PLS 115 or PLS 120, PLS 381 or PLS 326 or PLS 455 or PLS 460

PLS 515 - Pasture Management
Hours: 3
Pasture Management. Four semester hours. A careful study of the literature concerning the soil and vegetative problems in regard to establishing, restoring, and maintaining pastures. Consideration will be given to pasture plans for this section of Texas, fertilizers to use, and good pasture practices to be observed. Prerequisite: PLS 326.

PLS 589 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study - Hours: One to four Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisites Consent of department head. Note May be repeated when the topic varies.

PLS 597 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

Agricultural Sciences

Rafael Bakhtavoryan
Assistant Professor
B.S., Armenian Agricultural Academy, M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M University

Douglas Eborn
Assistant Professor
B.S., Utah State University; M.S., Ph.D., Kansas State University

Gregory Eckerle
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., Colorado State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University

Derald Harp
Professor
B.S., M.S., Tarleton State University; Ph.D., Texas A&M University

Randy M Harp
Professor and Director School of Agriculture
B.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State University, M.S. New Mexico State University

Curtis Jones
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., Texas A&M University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University.

Douglas D. LaVergne
Assistant Professor
B.S., Southern University A&M College; M.S., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., Texas A&M University

Jose A. Lopez
Associate Professor
B.B.A., Ave Maria College; M.S., Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Robert L. Williams
Professor
M.S., Texas A&M University-Commerce; Ph.D., Texas Tech University