Studies In Children's & Adolescent Literature & Culture Graduate Certificate

The Studies In Children's & Adolescent Literature & Culture Graduate Certificate requires admission to the Graduate School and 15 semester hours of graduate courses from the following.

Requirement to complete graduate certificate program.
ENG 504Pic Bks Graph Nar Art Img3
ENG 505Inven Chil Lit & Chldhood3
ENG 506Prob Adolescent Literatur3
ENG 507Narr Trans Lit Ch Adol3
ENG 508Constr Real Ch Adol Lit3
Total Hours15

Note:
Coursework must be completed at Texas A&M University-Commerce with a 3.0 GPA on all courses for graduate certificate.  (No Substitutions)

ENG 501 - Structure Eng Language
Hours: 3
Structure of the English Language. Three semester hours. A thorough analysis of the grammatical structure of English employing contemporary as well as more traditional methodologies. Emphasis varies among phonology, morphology, syntax, text/discourse analysis and historical developments in the language.

ENG 503 - Marginalized Literatures
Hours: 3
Marginalized Literatures - Three semester hours A study of emergent or historically marginalized literatures that considers the relationship between important social categories such as class, race, nationality or sexuality and imaginative works that represent these categories in a range of historical, cultural, and national contexts. The course may focus on contemporary or historical literatures from any world culture, and the primary focus will be on considering the limits of modernity, group identity, and national consciousness as objects of literary and cultural analysis. May be repeated for credit when the emphasis changes.

ENG 504 - Pic Bks Graph Nar Art Img
Hours: 3
Picture Books, Graphic Narrative, and the Art of Images. Three semester hours. An Examination of the historical, cultural ideological, aesthetic, material and critical contexts that influence and produce picture books and graphic narratives written for young readers, including a study of how words, images, and institutions shape our response to those texts.

ENG 505 - Inven Chil Lit & Chldhood
Hours: 3
The Invention of Children's Literature and Childhood. Three semester hours. A survey of the historical development of children's literature i relation to its cultural, intellectual, and political contexts. Could include how British and American writers changed paradigms for and perceptions about "childhood" and "children's literature" by developing literature that entertained and instructed young readers as well as how conditions of print culture, political change, and social status influenced the delivery and reception of the genre.

ENG 506 - Prob Adolescent Literatur
Hours: 3
Problems in Adolescent Literature. Three semester hours. An overview of the various problems associated with adolescent literature including the problem novel and new realism, how adolescent literature is defined issues associated with censorship and the problems adolescents experience in the texts.

ENG 507 - Narr Trans Lit Ch Adol
Hours: 3
Narrative Transformations in Literature for Children and Adolescents. Three semester hours. A study in the adaptation or appropriation of familiar or traditional story forms such as folk and fairy tales into more contemporary narrative forms including novels and film.

ENG 508 - Constr Real Ch Adol Lit
Hours: 3
Constructing Reality and Reconstructing History in Children's and Adolescent Literature. Three semester hours. An overview of historical fiction and realistic literature that emphasizes the cultural and social milleu that produced the texts as represented by the genres. Particular attention will be paid to the construction of history and the social realities addressed in the texts, including ethnic, racial and global considerations

ENG 509 - Literary Genres
Hours: 3
Literary Genres. Three semester hours. An examination of one or more literary genres. Topics and approaches may vary, but might include a focus on a particular historical period, theme, or critical approach to selected poetry, drama, non-fiction prose, fiction, or film. May be repeated for credit when the emphasis changes.

ENG 510 - Introduction to Film Studies
Hours: 3
Introduction to Film Studies - Three semester hours Designed for graduate students who have had no formal training in film study, this course will introduce basic skills and approaches to understanding and interpreting film through the "rhetoric" of film as it relates to the critical analysis of film (e.g., cultural criticism, genre, history, ideology).

ENG 513 - Learning Thru Composing
Hours: 3
Learning Through Composing. Three semester hours. Examines to what extent and how composing influences learning and knowledge, how the nature of knowledge is affected by composing and the kinds of knowledge transformations that occur through composing. Includes attention to uses of writing for learning across the curriculum.

ENG 515 - History & Theory Rhetoric
Hours: 3
History and Theory of Rhetoric. Three semester hours. A study of the major theories and theorists of rhetoric from classical times to the twentieth century. Emphasis varies from semester to semester. Attention is given to such theorists as Aristotle, Sophists, Plato, Cicero, Quintilian, Perelman, Richards, Weaver, and Moffett. May be repeated for credit when the emphasis changes.

ENG 516 - Early American Literature
Hours: 3
Early American Literature. Three semester hours. This course examines the rise of American narrative through the nation's colonial and early national periods, especially in British North America between 1620 and 1820. Topics for consideration could include exploration of how such narratives as the memoir, captivity narrative, sermon, and novel fostered the invention and formation of Americanness and American literature, examination of the fundamental ideas, myths, and intellectual concepts that still influence the ways in which Americans think about themselves and their societies and consideration of how anxieties about race, class, gender, and religion informed the creation of literary texts in early America.

ENG 518 - Thesis
Hours: 3-6
Thesis. Three to six semester hours. Required of candidates seeking the 30-hour Masters. Graded on a satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U) basis.

ENG 519 - American Lit in Transition
Hours: 3
American Literature in Transition: From Civil to World Wars. Three semester hours. This course investigates the ways in which the literature of the United States reflected the country's rapid political, industrial, economic, and social transformations between 1865 and 1914. Topics for discussion could include the rise of literary realism, the significance of American regional writing, a growing emphasis on vernacular traditions, the impact of immigration the phenomenon of the New Woman and the uses of naturalistic writing to capture America's ever-changing urban landscape.

ENG 520 - Appr to Critical Theory
Hours: 3
Approaches to Critical Theory. Three semester hours. A study of major trends in critical theory from Plato and Aristotle to the present. Primary focus is on various approaches to analyzing literature, including formalist, psychological, Marxist, structuralist, feminist, reader-response, and new historicism.

ENG 521 - American Modernities
Hours: 3
American Modernities. Three semester hours. Studies in various aspects of the period in American writing from the turn of the century to the Second World War. Special emphasis will be placed on the multifaceted and experimental nature of American literary modernism and the ways in which it was informed by the various social and art movements during this period. Subjects for analysis could include writings of the Lost Generation, the war novel, the influence of the visual arts on written texts, proletarian writing, the growing hybridity of generic form and literary representations of the Jazz Age as well as the Great Depression.

ENG 522 - Maj Figures in Amer Lit
Hours: 3
Major Figures in American Literature. Three semester hours. A focused analysis on a significant figure in American literature, or a treatment of two or more important writers who bear some kind of close personal or thematic relationship. May be repeated for credit when the emphasis.

ENG 525 - Contemporary Literature
Hours: 3
Contemporary Literature. Three semester hours. A study of post-1945 and recent literature in the United States and /or the United Kingdom and Ireland. Special emphasis will be placed on the ways in which national and international phenomena both social as well as aesthetic, have informed an increasingly diverse understanding of literary texts. Topics for analysis could include late Modernism and its links to postmodern thought, Cold War writing, literatures of nationhood, post colonialism, the institutionalization of theory, multiculturalism and its literary impact, and the ever-growing emphasis placed on generic hybridity, especially as it concerns visual and electronic media. May be repeated for credit when the emphasis changes.

ENG 526 - Studies in Shakespeare
Hours: 3
Studies in Shakespeare. Three semester hours. A study of selected comedies, tragedies, histories, and the major critical theories. Also emphasizes the historical, intellectual, and social background of Shakespeare's England.

ENG 527 - Antebellum American Lit
Hours: 3
Antebellum American Literature. Three semester hours. Studies in various aspects of American literature from around 1820 to the closing day of the Civil War. Topics covered may include the transition from republicanism to Jacksonian democracy, the influences of romanticism, the canonization of the American Renaissance, sentimental narrative and the literary marketplace transcendentalism the rise of literary journalism and debates surrounding the romance and the novel as generic distinctions

ENG 530 - History of Narrative Film
Hours: 3
History of Narrative Film - Three semester hours An examination of the development of film from the silent era to the present. Focus may be on American film, or other national cinemas ( e.g., English, Italian, French, Soviet, Japanese, Brazilian, Chinese, Mexican). May be repeated as topics vary to a maximum of 6 hours.

ENG 531 - Maj Fig & Mov Brit Lit
Hours: 3
Major Figures and Movements in British Literature. Three semester hours. A thorough study of the age, the work, and the influence of a major British literary figure; or, treatment of two or three important figures who have some close relationship to one another; or, a thorough study of a specific literary movement or theoretical approach to an author or group of authors. May be repeated for credit when the emphasis changes.

ENG 534 - Med Renaiss Brit Lit
Hours: 3
Medieval and Renaissance British Literature. Three semester hours. Individual investigation and group discussion of selected topic. May focus on major figures, critical or historical approaches, themes, or genres in British literature before 1660. May be repeated for credit when the emphasis changes.

ENG 536 - The Age of Reason
Hours: 3
The Age of Reason. Three semester hours. Individual investigation and group discussion of selected topic. May focus on major figures, critical or historical approaches, themes, or genres in British literature from 1660-1830. May be repeated for credit when the emphasis changes.

ENG 537 - Mod Transf Brit Irish Lit
Hours: 3
Modern Transformations: British and Irish Literature. Three semester hours. Individual investigation and group discussion of selected topic. May focus on major figures, critical or historical approaches, themes, or genres in British literature from 1830-1945. May be repeated for credit when the emphasis changes.

ENG 540 - Development British Novel
Hours: 3
Development of the British Novel. Three semester hours. A study of the origin and development of the novel in Great Britain from the eighteenth century to the present. Novels by authors such as Fielding, Austen, Dickens, Hardy, Woolf, and Joyce may be included.

ENG 555 - General Linguistics
Hours: 3
General Linguistics. Three semester hours. An advanced survey of applied language science with an emphasis on the relationship between the structural systems of language and the mental representation of ordinary experience. Stresses phonology, morphology and syntax.

ENG 557 - Teaching English as a Second/Other Language Methods I
Hours: 3
This course focuses on the linguistic, psychological, and socio-cultural foundations for teaching English to native speakers of other languages. It surveys historical as well as current trends in the methods and materials of ESL, of language testing, and of language-program evaluation.

ENG 558 - Sociolinguistics
Hours: 3
Sociolinguistics. Three semester hours. This course focuses on the various aspects of human behavior and sociocultural interaction that affect language structure, use, learning, and acquisition. Topics discussed include sociolinguistic methodology, multilinguistics, speech-act types, language styles, language and sex roles, and the sociolinguistics of literature.

ENG 559 - Lang & Culture in Class
Hours: 3
Language and Culture in the Classroom. Three semester hours. This course will focus on language diversity in education. Of particular interest will be societal factors that influence education- racism, ethnicity, sexism, bilingualism and bidialectalism and how these dynamics often affect the decisions educators make in designing and implementing language curriculum in the classroom.

ENG 562 - Psycholinguistics
Hours: 3
Psycholinguistics. Three semester hours. A survey of the cognitive, affective and developmental constraints on language acquisition and use. Topics include multilingualism; language, mind and brain; language processing and comprehension; first and second language acquisition; and research tools.

ENG 563 - Publishing
Hours: 3
Creative and Scholarly Publishing - Three semester hours This class is a practicum for students interested in publishing their creative or academic work. Students will work on preparing their work for publication, researching potential markets, and study how to submit work for publication. Extensive research on publishing and peer critiques. Pre-requisite: ENG 578

ENG 570 - Strategies in Composition
Hours: 4
A survey of approaches and strategies in the composing process and in the analysis of forms in composition, with particular emphasis on professional writing.

ENG 573 - Colloquim Interns
Hours: 1

ENG 578 - Workshop on Writing
Hours: 3
Workshop on Writing. Three semester hours. A workshop in writing poetry, fiction, non-fiction prose, or screenplays. Extensive writing and peer critiques. May be repeated for credit when the emphasis changes.

ENG 579 - Style and Stylistics
Hours: 3
This course may cover any of the following areas of stylistic analysis: applied linguistics to a specific genre or genres; rhetorical and stylistic approaches to writing in various styles; teaching English as a second language; areas of literary criticism that employ stylistic analysis; a digital humanities approach using corpus stylistics.

ENG 585 - Workshop on Writing: Forms and Genres
Hours: 3
Workshop on Writing: Forms and Genres. This class is an advanced, intensive, reading and writing course that focuses on a specific genre of poetry or prose based on instructor specialization. Students will read and write in the assigned genre. Extensive writing and peer critiques. May be repeated for credit when the genre changes.

ENG 589 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

ENG 595 - Research Lit/Techniques
Hours: 3
Research Literature and Techniques. Three semester hours. Required of students who opt for the 36-hour Masters. This course requires an extensive investigation into a topic agreed upon by the student and the advisory committee. Graded on a satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U) basis.

ENG 596 - Practicum in TESOL
Hours: 1-3
Practicum in TESOL. One to three semester hours. Hands-on application of TESOL methods and techniques. In coordination with an Applied Linguistics adviser, candidates will teach in a mutually-agreed upon ESL setting. Graded on a satisfactory (S) and unsatisfactory (U) basis.

ENG 597 - SPECIAL TOPICS
Hours: 3

ENG 599 - Bib & Methods of Research
Hours: 3
Bibliography and Methods of Research. Three semester hours. For beginning literature and languages graduate students who have not had an equivalent graduate-level course, this course covers manuscript preparation, format; research techniques for literary, linguistics, and composition/rhetoric studies.

ENG 610 - Studies in Film Genres
Hours: 3
Studies in Film Genres - Three semester hours An examination of film genres, either by surveying the various genres or examining a particular genre (such as westerns, film noir, or French New Wave), through the eyes of a particular director or culture. May be repeated as topics vary to a maximum of 6 hours.

ENG 613 - Digital Humanities
Hours: 3
Digital Humanities: A study of theories and methods relating to the use of computational and digital tools to pursue questions of research and teaching in the humanities. The course will explore the ways in which technologies are complex, socially situated, and political tools through which humans act and make meaning. The course may focus on specific disciplinary questions relating to research or pedagogy, or may take an interdisciplinary or transdisciplinary approach. May be repeated for credit when the emphasis changes. General familiarity with the Internet is suggested, but no prior knowledge of digital humanities or programming knowledge is required.

ENG 615 - Professing English
Hours: 3
Professing English - Three semester hours Primarily for English doctoral students, English 615 is an introduction to the profession of English—that is, the process by which one becomes a professional. Issues covered will include the curriculum vita, abstracts, dissertation proposals, dissertations, the job search, the research process beyond graduate school. The course will also include history of English as a part of the college curriculum. This course is required of all doctoral students. Graded on a satisfactory (S) and unsatisfactory (U) basis

ENG 620 - Adaptations to Film
Hours: 3
Adaptations to Film - Three semester hours Examines the relationship between film, literature and other sources and the unique qualities of each medium. Special emphasis on film adaptations of literary works from western and non-western cultures.

ENG 657 - Teaching English as a Second/Other Language Methods II
Hours: 3
This is the second course in a two course sequence designed to prepare individuals to become teachers of ESOL. It complements the theoretical and historical perspective of TESOL Methods I with a focus on classroom practices (e.g. micro-teaching, classroom management, lesson planning, content development, and building intercultural awareness). Prerequisites: ENG 557 or instructor approval.

ENG 658 - Sound Systems of English: Pedagogical Applications of Phonology & Phonetics
Hours: 3
This course focuses on the application of phonological principles and practices to TESOL teaching. Within a framework of communicative competence, we will examine different approaches to pronunciation teaching in the ESL/EFL classroom and investigate a variety of techniques and activities. Prerequisites: ENG 555 or instructor approval.

ENG 670 - Pragmatics & Language Tchg
Hours: 3
Pragmatics and Language Teaching - Three semester hours Pragmatics and Language Teaching is an introduction to the role of pragmatics in the second language classroom. With an underlying focus in our readings and discussions on cross-cultural pragmatics, it investigates the following questions: What is pragmatics? How can it help classroom language teaching? How can we integrate pragmatics in the classroom? How can pragmatics help us to understand student development? This is an introductory level graduate course on pragmatics and language teaching, and no background in this area is required. Pre-requisites: ENG 555

ENG 671 - Discourse Analysis
Hours: 3
Discourse Analysis - Three semester hours The course focuses on the nature of spoken and written discourse and the applications of discourse analysis to TESOL. It examines written and spoken macro- and micro-level discourse practices inside and outside of the classroom including investigation of transactional and interactional discourse events and multiple genres. With a focus on both approaches to analysis and teaching, the course is designed to bridge the gap between researcher and practitioner and to encourage teachers to use similar techniques in their classroom teaching. Pre-requisites: ENG 555

ENG 672 - Second Language Acquisition
Hours: 3
Second Language Acquisition - Three semester hours This initial-level seminar focuses on “perennial” issues that arise in the study of second language acquisition and our current understanding, re-evaluation and discussion of these issues within the field. It covers both the historical development of the field and current areas of growth such as neurocognitive models of second language acquisition. With a focus on both approaches to second language data analysis and developing theoretical frameworks, the course is designed for graduate students who are primarily research-oriented or primarily practitioners. Pre-requisites: Instructor Approval

ENG 675 - Colloq: Teach Coll Rdg & Wtg
Hours: 3
Colloquium: Teaching College Reading and Writing. Three semester hours. A practicum in formulating syllabi in rhetoric that integrate selected textbooks and the theory of composition, and in the daily problems inherent in teaching expository writing. The class is required of all English assistant instructors in either the first or second semester they hold an assistantship. Graded on a satisfactory (S) and unsatisfactory (U) basis. Not applicable to hours for MA/MS degree. Prerequisite: Permission of the department Head.

ENG 677 - Issues in Literacy
Hours: 3
A study of the problems and issues concerning literacy, literacy teaching, and literacy research. The course examines the social, political, educational, and cultural influences on literacy. May include emphasis on particular populations or problems.

ENG 680 - Rdg Theory Coll Eng Tchrs
Hours: 3
Reading Theory for College English Teachers. Three semester hours. An examination of the relationship between reading and writing developments and applications to instruction. Approaches reading and writing as cultural and cognitive activities. Integrates theoretical readings with classroom practices. Crossover course: May count for either area.

ENG 681 - Academic Discourse
Hours: 3
A workshop-based course designed to introduce graduate students to the nature of academic writing. Students will analyze their own texts and published scholarship with the goals of refining or producing texts that reflect the conventions associated with academic discourse and identifying strategies that will assist in developing a unique but professional voice/style.

ENG 685 - Computational Linguistics
Hours: 3
Computational Linguistics Description : This course provides a general introduction to Computational Linguistics, the study of computational systems that understand and generate human language. This class will cover fundamental concepts and techniques in Computational Linguistics, such as lexical and ontological semantics, word sense disambiguation, syntactic and semantic parsing, discourse (including coreference resolution), dialogue, summarization, and generation. Throughout the class, students will be exposed to recent research that connects the concepts learned to exciting research questions that are practically motivated and application-oriented. Additional emphasis will be on the different traditions and theoretical frameworks that informed the theories and algorithms used for these solutions, namely, linguistics, statistics, and computer science, and the history of their struggle from the 1950s until today. Instructor's approval required

ENG 686 - Quantitative Methods for Linguists
Hours: 3
This course is designed to help graduate students with a background in linguistics, but no active knowledge of statistical methods, appreciate the basic concepts in descriptive and analytical statistics as relevant for work in the humanities, in particular linguistics. In the field of linguistics a working knowledge of statistics is crucial to both understanding the professional literature and to conducting experiments, analyzing results, and writing reports that are considered publishable. Students will be empowered to calculate general tendencies and dispersions in their own data, determine the statistical significance of their results, and report those results in a manner that accurately and professionally communicates them to the scientific community.

ENG 689 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

ENG 697 - Special Topic
Hours: 3
Special Topics. Three semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

ENG 697A - Special Topic
Hours: 3
Special Topics. Three semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

ENG 710 - Film Theory & Criticism
Hours: 3
Film Theory & Criticism - Three semester hours A survey of theoretical and critical approaches to analysis of film and video with an emphasis on the historical and cultural context in which these approaches emerge, examining selections from western and non-western film theory and criticism. Prerequisite: English 510 or equivalent college-level course, or consent of instructor.

ENG 718 - Doctoral Dissertation
Hours: 3-12
Doctoral Dissertation. Three to nine semester hours. Credit not to exceed nine semester hours. Graded on a satisfactory (S) and unsatisfactory (U) basis.

ENG 720 - Sptc: in Film Studies
Hours: 3
Special Topics in Film Studies - Three semester hours Extended investigation of major subjects and issues in cinema and other media; topics vary but may include studies of author/directors, historical movements, critical approaches, and themes. May be repeated as topics vary to a maximum of 6 hours.

ENG 771 - Theory/Practice of Tchng
Hours: 3
Theory and Practice of Teaching Reading and Writing in College Study of the objectives of college English; methods and materials for the teaching of college English, including technology; curriculum planning; administration of English writing programs. This course is recommended for doctoral students planning to teach on the college level and may be used toward the 21-hour Professional Internship requirement. 3 SCH.

ENG 775 - Teaching Literature in College
Hours: 3
Teaching of Literature in College. Three semester hours. Methods and theories of teaching the interpretation of literary and nonliterary texts to college students.

ENG 776 - Approaches to Teaching of Writ
Hours: 3
Approaches to the Teaching of Writing. Three semester hours. Methods and daily problems inherent in teaching composition to specialized college audiences with stress on basic writers, the learning disabled, and students being tutored. May include measurement of writing, administration of writing centers, and tutoring practices.

ENG 780 - Text and Genders
Hours: 3
Texts and Genders - Three semester hours A critical examination of how gender differences influence reading and writing strategies of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and film, including issues of gender and style, gender and usage, and gender stereotyping. This course is recommended for doctoral students planning to teach and/or produce scholarship on the college level.

ENG 781 - Major Figures World Lit
Hours: 3
Major Figures in World Literature A study of major literary works from both classical and contemporary literature in diverse genres outside the English language tradition. This course is required for doctoral students specializing in Critical Literacy (the study of literature and film). 3 SCH.