History MA/MS

The purpose of the master's degree for students is to acquire advanced training in the discipline of history.  This program will introduce students to the ways professional historians research and communicate the results of their research.  At the completion of this program, students should be able to explain concepts in historiography and historical theory.  They also should understand how to conduct historical research and present their findings sufficiently well to be able to make contributions in the field in professional, academic venues.

Master of Arts/Master of Science in History - Option I Thesis

The student completing either a Master of Arts or a Master of Science Thesis program takes 36 semester hours and must take at least 11 of the 12 required courses in the Department of History. These 11 courses include 6 hours of thesis.  

* Note: Students must have completed both HIST 590 and HIST 591, or completed one and be enrolled in the other, before attempting the Qualifying Exam.

* Note: HIST 518 is a Pre/Co-Requisite for HIST 592.

Twelve-course program to be completed:

Thesis
HIST 518Thesis (6 semester hours required)3-6
Only 6 semester hours of credit for 518 per degree will be given upon satisfactory completion of the requirement
Graduate History Practicum
HIST 592Graduate History Practicum (Minimum 3 hours required, up to six allowed for credit)3
Only 6 semester hours of credit for 592 per degree will be given upon satisfactory completion of the requirement
Historiography and Methodology
HIST 590Historiography and Historical Theory3
Historical Methods
HIST 591Historical Research and Writing Methods3
Choose 9 semester hours from:
HIST 521Colloquium in Latin American History3
HIST 542Colloquium in Medieval European History3
HIST 543Colloquium in Early Modern European History3
HIST 544Colloquium in Modern European History3
HIST 551Colloquium in Colonial North American History3
HIST 552Colloquium in Revolutionary American Hist3
HIST 553Colloquium in Modern United States History, 1850-19203
HIST 554Colloquium in U. S. Post 19203
Choose 9 semester hours from:
HIST 520Seminar in World/Comparative History3
HIST 540Seminar in European History3
HIST 550Seminar in American History3
HIST 555Seminar in History for Middle and High School Education3
HIST 564Introduction to Public History3
HIST 597Special Topic3
Elective
Choose a 3 semester hour graduate history course, a 3 semester hour graduate level course outside of History, or a second semester of HIST 592.3
Total Hours36

Master of Arts/Master of Science in History - Option II Non-Thesis

A student completing a Master of Arts or Master of Science Non-Thesis program is required to complete 36 semester hours and to take at least 10 of the 12 required courses in the Department of History and the remaining 2 outside of History.

* Note: Students must have completed both HIST 590 and HIST 591, or completed one and be enrolled in the other, before attempting the Qualifying Exam.

Twelve-course program to be completed:

Research
HIST 595Research Literature and Techniques (3 semester hours required)3
Required courses (6 semester hours)
HIST 590Historiography and Historical Theory3
HIST 591Historical Research and Writing Methods3
Choose 9 semester hours from the following:
HIST 521Colloquium in Latin American History3
HIST 542Colloquium in Medieval European History3
HIST 543Colloquium in Early Modern European History3
HIST 544Colloquium in Modern European History3
HIST 551Colloquium in Colonial North American History3
HIST 552Colloquium in Revolutionary American Hist3
HIST 553Colloquium in Modern United States History, 1850-19203
HIST 554Colloquium in U. S. Post 19203
Choose 9 semester hours from the following:
HIST 520Seminar in World/Comparative History3
HIST 540Seminar in European History3
HIST 550Seminar in American History3
HIST 555Seminar in History for Middle and High School Education3
HIST 564Introduction to Public History3
HIST 597Special Topic3
History Elective
Choose 3 semester hours from history:3
Electives
Choose 6 semester hours graduate level courses outside of History6
Total Hours36

Master of Science in History, Political Science Track - Option II Non-Thesis

A Master of Science Non-Thesis student who completes this Political Science Track will meet the minimum Texas state qualifications required to teach both history and political science in higher education institutions, such as community colleges and universities. The Political Science Track Option may only be obtained as a Master of Science degree and cannot be obtained in combination with a thesis. This is a non-thesis track only.

*Note: Students must have completed both HIST 590 and HIST 591, or completed one and be enrolled in the other, before attempting the Qualifying Exam.

Twelve-course program to be completed:

Research
HIST 595Research Literature and Techniques (3 semester hours required)3
Required Courses
6 semester hours
HIST 590Historiography and Historical Theory3
HIST 591Historical Research and Writing Methods3
Political Science Track
History Courses
9 semester hours of graduate level History courses9
Political Science Courses
18 semester hours of graduate level Political Science courses.18
Total Hours36

HIST 518 - Thesis
Hours: 3-6
This course is for students who are on the MA/MS thesis track working toward receiving a master's in history. Prerequisites: HIST 590, HIST 591, and students must pass the History Department Qualifying Examination prior to enrollment.

HIST 520 - Seminar in World/Comparative History
Hours: 3
This course provides a focused and thorough analysis of a topic in World or Comparative History through reading and discussing the relevant historiography, and through guided student research. Topic will vary from semester to semester. Students may retake the course for credit as the topic changes.

HIST 521 - Colloquium in Latin American History
Hours: 3
This course will offer in-depth readings in various topics relating to the political, economic, social, cultural and diplomatic history of Mexico, Central and South America from pre-Columbian times to the present. Regional emphasis may vary from semester to semester.

HIST 534 - Capstone Project in the History of Christianity
Hours: 3
The capstone project, approved by and completed under the supervision of the certificate program Coordinator/Director, is a significant demonstration of the student’s research expertise in the history of Christianity and command of relevant scholarship in the subject.

HIST 535 - Introduction to the History of Religion
Hours: 3
This course introduces graduate students to the history of religion by looking at topics and themes such as doctrine, ritual, scripture, mysticism, pilgrimage, and myth across two or more religions, including Christianity, while also introducing methodological approaches to the comparative study of religion.

HIST 540 - Seminar in European History
Hours: 3
Seminar in European History. Three semester hours. This course provides a focused and thorough analysis of a topic in European History through reading and discussing the relevant historiography, and through guided student research involving primary sources. Topic will vary from semester to semester. Students may retake the course for credit as the topic changes.

HIST 542 - Colloquium in Medieval European History
Hours: 3
This course provides an introduction to the wide range of research questions and historiographical debates which occupy historians of Europe from approximately 500 to 1500. Readings will concentrate on the collapse of the Roman Empire, the establishment and nature of medieval Christianity, the Carolingian Renaissance, the characteristics of a "feudal" economy and society, medieval technology, the Italian Renaissance, and the early period of European expansion.

HIST 543 - Colloquium in Early Modern European History
Hours: 3
This course provides an introduction to the wide range of research questions and historiographical debates which occupy historians of Europe from approximately 1500 to 1789. Readings will concentrate on the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, urbanization and economic change, European expansion and the world economy, the witch craze, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution.

HIST 544 - Colloquium in Modern European History
Hours: 3
This course provides an introduction to the wide range of research questions and historiographical debates which occupy historians of Europe from approximately 1789 to the present. Readings will concentrate on the French Revolution; ideas and movements such as liberalism, socialism, nationalism, imperialism, feminism, and modernism; industrialization; war and society; mass media and popular culture; and the rise and fall of Communism.

HIST 550 - Seminar in American History
Hours: 3
Topics in American History. Three semester hours. This course provides a focused and thorough analysis of a topic in American History through reading and discussing the relevant historiography, and through guided student research involving primary sources. Topic will vary from semester to semester. Students may retake the course for credit as the topic changes.

HIST 551 - Colloquium in Colonial North American History
Hours: 3
This course provides an introduction to the wide range of research questions and historiographical debates which occupy historians of the United States from the colonial period through 1775. Readings will concentrate on European contact, exploration, and settlement; the emergence of American social, cultural, economic and political institutions; and the origins of the struggle for American independence.

HIST 552 - Colloquium in Revolutionary American Hist
Hours: 3
This course provides an introduction to the wide range of research questions and historiographical debates which occupy early Americanists specializing in the era of the American Revolution and the early national period of the United States to 1850. Readings will concentrate on the origins of the American Revolution; the shaping of American social, economic, and political institutions in the wake of independence and the drafting of the Constitution; the rise and triumph of the Jeffersonian Republicans; the advent of radical democratic culture in the early 1800s; religious revivalism and social reform movements; and the dilemma of slavery in the advent of sectional tension and rivalry.

HIST 553 - Colloquium in Modern United States History, 1850-1920
Hours: 3
This course provides an introduction to the wide range of research questions and historiographical debates which occupy historians of the United States from 1850 to 1920. Readings will concentrate on the origins and course of the Civil War; Reconstruction; the economic, political, social and cultural changes caused by industrialization; and the rise of the United States to preeminence as a world power.

HIST 554 - Colloquium in U. S. Post 1920
Hours: 3
This course provides an introduction to the wide range of research questions and historiographical debates which occupy historians of the United States from 1920 to the present. Readings will concentrate on American involvement in the World Wars; the rise of the United States to military, economic, and technological dominance; the social and cultural upheavals which accompanied that rise; and recent challenges to that hegemony.

HIST 555 - Seminar in History for Middle and High School Education
Hours: 3
This course provides a variety of investigations, involving primary sources, into World, European, and American histories designed for history and social studies teachers in grades four through twelve. Topic will vary from semester to semester. Students may retake the course for credit as the topic changes. This course will count as PDAS continuing education hours for public school teachers.

HIST 561 - Introduction to Public History
Hours: 3
This course introduces students to the practice, history, and development of the field of Public History. Over the course of the semester, students will be divided into different groups to develop a grant proposal, museum exhibit or interpretive presentation. The goal of this course is to provide students with the information, organizational skills, and training necessary to foster community outreach and involvement. Topics covered in the course include the creation of local partnerships and support networks, identification of state, local, and federal funding opportunities, and the creation of engaging exhibits and interpretive programs.

HIST 564 - Introduction to Public History
Hours: 3
This course introduces the field of Public History by examining topics that range from historical methods and interpretation, historical analysis, public interactions, and controversies associated with the practice of public history. Crosslisted with: HIST 462.

HIST 566 - Oral History Theory and Methods
Hours: 3
This course introduces the theory and practice of oral history. Students will engage with the central theoretical issues of the field, including the construction of memory, narrative, subjectivity, and structures of social power.

HIST 567 - Internship in Public History
Hours: 3
This internship and capstone project is designed as a significant demonstration of the student’s ability to combine theory and practice in a project that has to be approved by and under the supervision of the certificate program Director. To register for the internship, the student must complete both HIST 564 and a project proposal. Prerequisites: HIST 564 and submission of project proposal.

HIST 589 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-3
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies.Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

HIST 590 - Historiography and Historical Theory
Hours: 3
The discipline of History has a long history and a diverse set of practitioners. This course samples this variety by discussing selected figures who have shaped the forms of historical writing in the Western tradition from the ancient Greeks to the present day. Students will develop analytic skills in identifying and critiquing the arguments of professional historians, learn and deploy the terminology associated with historical argumentation, and apply such in writing a historiographical essay. Students must successfully complete HIST 590 and HIST 591 or have successfully completed either HIST 590 or HIST 591 and be enrolled in the other before attempting to take their departmental qualifying exams.

HIST 591 - Historical Research and Writing Methods
Hours: 3
This course introduces students to the methods of historical research, including the framing of research questions; the location, analysis, and evaluation of sources; the construction of argument and counter-argument; and the presentation of results. The goal of this course is to guide each student through the preparation of a conference-length paper or publishable article as well as the process of proposing that paper to an appropriate conference or scholarly journal. Students must successfully complete HIST 590 and HIST 591 or have successfully completed either HIST 590 or HIST 591 and be enrolled in the other before attempting to take their departmental qualifying exams.

HIST 592 - Graduate History Practicum
Hours: 3
New trends in the historical profession increasingly require that graduate students have experience producing research prepared for conference paper delivery or publication. This course will provide students guidance in using their thesis research in the preparation of a conference paper and/or for proposed publication in an academic journal or anthology. Students in the course will be required to propose the paper to an academic conference or submit the article to an academic journal or anthology call for papers for consideration. This course will meet regularly & is for students who are on the MA/MS thesis track a master's in history. Prerequisites: HIST 590, HIST 591 and students must pass the History Department Qualifying Examination prior to enrollment. Pre or co-requisite: HIST 518.

HIST 595 - Research Literature and Techniques
Hours: 3
Required of students in Option II. This course requires an extensive investigation into a topic agreed upon by the student and instructor. The student will produce an historiographical essay and annotated bibliography under the direction of the instructor. Note: "The students is required to demonstrate competence in systematic research procedure." Prerequisites: HIST 590, HIST 591 and students must pass the History Department Qualifying Examination prior to enrollment.

HIST 597 - Special Topic
Hours: 3
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.